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Celebration and Announcements

The feeling of community is one that stays with our Grammarians from the moment they enter the School on their first day, until long after they leave. Sharing your news of new chapters in life through Information Exchange (IE) helps us stay connected as a community and provides us with the opportunity to acknowledge these significant milestones.

We enjoy learning about the significant events – career developments, travels, study, the birth of children, and partnerships – that feature in our OG's lives. If you'd like to contribute to IE, please contact community@mggs.vic.edu.au

Births

  • Daniel and Jacqueline Burrows (Hang 2001) welcomed Isabelle Rosalind Burrows on 19 July 2021.

Births

  • Daniel and Jacqueline Burrows (Hang 2001) welcomed Isabelle Rosalind Burrows on 19 July 2021.

Births

  • Daniel and Jacqueline Burrows (Hang 2001) welcomed Isabelle Rosalind Burrows on 19 July 2021.

Celebrations

  •  Margaret Spring (Colclough, 1939) celebrated her 100th birthday in November. 
  •  Jessie Smith (2004) has secured a barrister's pupillage at Doughty Street Chambers, the leading human rights set in London. At the conclusion of her PhD at Cambridge, Jessie will join eminent Australian lawyers including Geoffrey Robertson QC and Gillian Triggs - United Nations Assistant Secretary-General, alongside Amal Clooney, Sir Keir Starmer - leader of the UK Labour Party, Sir Howard Morrison - former UK Judge to the International Criminal Court and Prince Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein - former UN human rights chief. She will be practicing in criminal law, human rights law and international criminal law. 
  • Elizabeth Spry (1998) has been awarded an Alfred Deakin Postdoctoral Fellowship, commencing at Deakin University in 2022, for her research into intergenerational health. Elizabeth is currently working in a postdoctoral role with Deakin University.

Celebrations

  •  Margaret Spring (Colclough, 1939) celebrated her 100th birthday in November. 
  •  Jessie Smith (2004) has secured a barrister's pupillage at Doughty Street Chambers, the leading human rights set in London. At the conclusion of her PhD at Cambridge, Jessie will join eminent Australian lawyers including Geoffrey Robertson QC and Gillian Triggs - United Nations Assistant Secretary-General, alongside Amal Clooney, Sir Keir Starmer - leader of the UK Labour Party, Sir Howard Morrison - former UK Judge to the International Criminal Court and Prince Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein - former UN human rights chief. She will be practicing in criminal law, human rights law and international criminal law. 
  • Elizabeth Spry (1998) has been awarded an Alfred Deakin Postdoctoral Fellowship, commencing at Deakin University in 2022, for her research into intergenerational health. Elizabeth is currently working in a postdoctoral role with Deakin University.

Celebrations

  •  Margaret Spring (Colclough, 1939) celebrated her 100th birthday in November. 
  •  Jessie Smith (2004) has secured a barrister's pupillage at Doughty Street Chambers, the leading human rights set in London. At the conclusion of her PhD at Cambridge, Jessie will join eminent Australian lawyers including Geoffrey Robertson QC and Gillian Triggs - United Nations Assistant Secretary-General, alongside Amal Clooney, Sir Keir Starmer - leader of the UK Labour Party, Sir Howard Morrison - former UK Judge to the International Criminal Court and Prince Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein - former UN human rights chief. She will be practicing in criminal law, human rights law and international criminal law. 
  • Elizabeth Spry (1998) has been awarded an Alfred Deakin Postdoctoral Fellowship, commencing at Deakin University in 2022, for her research into intergenerational health. Elizabeth is currently working in a postdoctoral role with Deakin University.

Marriages

  • Vivienne Crompton (2005) married Marcus Brown on Friday 9 April 2021 at St John's Anglican Church, Toorak, with the reception at the Alexandra Club.

Marriages

  • Vivienne Crompton (2005) married Marcus Brown on Friday 9 April 2021 at St John's Anglican Church, Toorak, with the reception at the Alexandra Club.

Marriages

  • Vivienne Crompton (2005) married Marcus Brown on Friday 9 April 2021 at St John's Anglican Church, Toorak, with the reception at the Alexandra Club.
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Vivienne and Marcus Brown after tying the knot.
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Vivienne and Marcus Brown after tying the knot.
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Vale

Acknowledging, celebrating and paying tribute to the women who make up our Melbourne Girls Grammar community is important to us. Graduates of Melbourne Girls Grammar and other community members have gone on to do incredible things with their lives.

If you'd like to pass on an obituary for an Old Grammarian or past staff member for IE, please email community@mggs.vic.edu.au

  • Robin Benjamin (Williams 1959) 4 August 2021
  • Margaret Bourke (Cumpston 1961) 7 August 2021
  • Cynthia De Lisle (Ferguson 1945) 15 October 2021
  • Faye Ennis-Harris (Hunt 1950) 22 August 2021
  • Sarah Harry (1990) 27 March 2021
  • Pat Hocking (Stillman 1940) 26 July 2021
  • Janet Jones (Balderstone 1980) 27 October 2021
  • Barbara Lovell (Lee 1950) 23 January 2021
  • Prudence McColl (1962) 15 July 2021
  • Natalie Peate (Wagner 1950) 13 April 2021
  • Nola Plackett (Pierce 1954) 5 January 2020
  • Hazel Spiller (Beswicke 1939) 12 April 2021
  • Antoinette Russell (Kirkpatrick 1944) 29 May 2021
  • Catherine Wileman (MacDermott 1956) March 2020
  • Alison Webster (May 1950) 1 May 2021
  • Margaret Wesley (Redfearn 1948) 8 May 2021

Vale

Acknowledging, celebrating and paying tribute to the women who make up our Melbourne Girls Grammar community is important to us. Graduates of Melbourne Girls Grammar and other community members have gone on to do incredible things with their lives.

If you'd like to pass on an obituary for an Old Grammarian or past staff member for IE, please email community@mggs.vic.edu.au

  • Robin Benjamin (Williams 1959) 4 August 2021
  • Margaret Bourke (Cumpston 1961) 7 August 2021
  • Cynthia De Lisle (Ferguson 1945) 15 October 2021
  • Faye Ennis-Harris (Hunt 1950) 22 August 2021
  • Sarah Harry (1990) 27 March 2021
  • Pat Hocking (Stillman 1940) 26 July 2021
  • Janet Jones (Balderstone 1980) 27 October 2021
  • Barbara Lovell (Lee 1950) 23 January 2021
  • Prudence McColl (1962) 15 July 2021
  • Natalie Peate (Wagner 1950) 13 April 2021
  • Nola Plackett (Pierce 1954) 5 January 2020
  • Hazel Spiller (Beswicke 1939) 12 April 2021
  • Antoinette Russell (Kirkpatrick 1944) 29 May 2021
  • Catherine Wileman (MacDermott 1956) March 2020
  • Alison Webster (May 1950) 1 May 2021
  • Margaret Wesley (Redfearn 1948) 8 May 2021

Robin Benjamin (Williams 1959)

Robin spent 12 years at MGGS, commencing in kindergarten. The philosophy of D.J. Ross appealed to her paediatrician father Stanley, and mother, Joy. Robin’s sisters Jan and Belinda followed. She had happy memories of school and made several lifelong friends. Robin’s love of literature and her enquiring mind continued her whole life, enjoying 35 years at the same book club. She was a regular theatre and NGV attendee. She chose Mercer House for teacher training and continued to teach until retirement. She loved her rural experience at Mt Buller where she was the first teacher on the mountain, as well as at several centres in Melbourne, in London when travelling and her secretarial work at the Australian Defence Department. Robin and her gemologist husband, Frank, cherished their three children and six grandchildren. The children each experienced living overseas and Robin visited them in London, Germany, China and Finland, where one son resides.

Robin was a long-serving committee member and volunteer at the Princess Hill Community Centre, where she was very much valued. Before she became unwell from breast cancer, Robin regularly helped a homework group of refugee children, often joined by their grandparents. In her 80th year, she died peacefully at Peter McCallum Hospital.

Written by her sister, Jan.

Margaret Bourke (Cumpston 1961)

Margaret graduated in 1961 with excellent results. A keen bridge player, success came early, representing Victoria at the ANC for the first time in 1973. By the time she and husband, Tim Bourke, moved to Canberra in 1989 to join the Commonwealth Public Service, Margaret had represented Victoria in the Women’s Team 13 times at the ANC, winning six times. Margaret was proud of her 47 continual years of attendance at the ANC. However, her best performance was representing Australia on 31 occasions, currently more than any other player. Margaret and her husband were prolific collectors of bridge books and donated part of their collection of nearly 10,000 items to the State Library Victoria in Australia creating "the most extensive collection of books on the game of bridge in any public institution of the world” (Des Cowley, State Librarian). Once retired, Margaret threw herself into voluntary work, both at ABF headquarters in Canberra, and the Canberra Senior Citizens Book Fair for which she was the chief organizer for many years. Margaret died after a three-year battle against melanoma.

Written by her husband, Tim.

Cynthia De Lisle (Ferguson 1945)

Throughout our time together, Mum often told me of her very happy years at MGG. She often spoke of the many close friendships developed through those years, friends with whom she kept quite close contact over the 93 years of her life.

Throughout that life, Mum worked hard to help create a very happy life for myself, my sister and my two brothers. We always were a very happy family and Mum's life was rich and fulfilling in every way. Rest in peace Mum, with my fondest love.

Written by her son Chris.

Cynthia lived in Montville for many years where her husband, Gordon, had an art gallery. They were very much involved in the art world. Cynthia left school in 1945 as did Anne Browne (Nevitt) and I (Betty Darby). We kept in touch all those years – we had 13 children between us so were quite busy!! All 93 years old!

Written by school friend, Betty Sharp (Darby 1945).

Robin Benjamin (Williams 1959)

Robin spent 12 years at MGGS, commencing in kindergarten. The philosophy of D.J. Ross appealed to her paediatrician father Stanley, and mother, Joy. Robin’s sisters Jan and Belinda followed. She had happy memories of school and made several lifelong friends. Robin’s love of literature and her enquiring mind continued her whole life, enjoying 35 years at the same book club. She was a regular theatre and NGV attendee. She chose Mercer House for teacher training and continued to teach until retirement. She loved her rural experience at Mt Buller where she was the first teacher on the mountain, as well as at several centres in Melbourne, in London when travelling and her secretarial work at the Australian Defence Department. Robin and her gemologist husband, Frank, cherished their three children and six grandchildren. The children each experienced living overseas and Robin visited them in London, Germany, China and Finland, where one son resides.

Robin was a long-serving committee member and volunteer at the Princess Hill Community Centre, where she was very much valued. Before she became unwell from breast cancer, Robin regularly helped a homework group of refugee children, often joined by their grandparents. In her 80th year, she died peacefully at Peter McCallum Hospital.

Written by her sister, Jan.

Margaret Bourke (Cumpston 1961)

Margaret graduated in 1961 with excellent results. A keen bridge player, success came early, representing Victoria at the ANC for the first time in 1973. By the time she and husband, Tim Bourke, moved to Canberra in 1989 to join the Commonwealth Public Service, Margaret had represented Victoria in the Women’s Team 13 times at the ANC, winning six times. Margaret was proud of her 47 continual years of attendance at the ANC. However, her best performance was representing Australia on 31 occasions, currently more than any other player. Margaret and her husband were prolific collectors of bridge books and donated part of their collection of nearly 10,000 items to the State Library Victoria in Australia creating "the most extensive collection of books on the game of bridge in any public institution of the world” (Des Cowley, State Librarian). Once retired, Margaret threw herself into voluntary work, both at ABF headquarters in Canberra, and the Canberra Senior Citizens Book Fair for which she was the chief organizer for many years. Margaret died after a three-year battle against melanoma.

Written by her husband, Tim.

Cynthia De Lisle (Ferguson 1945)

Throughout our time together, Mum often told me of her very happy years at MGG. She often spoke of the many close friendships developed through those years, friends with whom she kept quite close contact over the 93 years of her life.

Throughout that life, Mum worked hard to help create a very happy life for myself, my sister and my two brothers. We always were a very happy family and Mum's life was rich and fulfilling in every way. Rest in peace Mum, with my fondest love.

Written by her son Chris.

Cynthia lived in Montville for many years where her husband, Gordon, had an art gallery. They were very much involved in the art world. Cynthia left school in 1945 as did Anne Browne (Nevitt) and I (Betty Darby). We kept in touch all those years – we had 13 children between us so were quite busy!! All 93 years old!

Written by school friend, Betty Sharp (Darby 1945).

Robin Benjamin (Williams 1959)

Robin spent 12 years at MGGS, commencing in kindergarten. The philosophy of D.J. Ross appealed to her paediatrician father Stanley, and mother, Joy. Robin’s sisters Jan and Belinda followed. She had happy memories of school and made several lifelong friends. Robin’s love of literature and her enquiring mind continued her whole life, enjoying 35 years at the same book club. She was a regular theatre and NGV attendee. She chose Mercer House for teacher training and continued to teach until retirement. She loved her rural experience at Mt Buller where she was the first teacher on the mountain, as well as at several centres in Melbourne, in London when travelling and her secretarial work at the Australian Defence Department. Robin and her gemologist husband, Frank, cherished their three children and six grandchildren. The children each experienced living overseas and Robin visited them in London, Germany, China and Finland, where one son resides.

Robin was a long-serving committee member and volunteer at the Princess Hill Community Centre, where she was very much valued. Before she became unwell from breast cancer, Robin regularly helped a homework group of refugee children, often joined by their grandparents. In her 80th year, she died peacefully at Peter McCallum Hospital.

Written by her sister, Jan.

Margaret Bourke (Cumpston 1961)

Margaret graduated in 1961 with excellent results. A keen bridge player, success came early, representing Victoria at the ANC for the first time in 1973. By the time she and husband, Tim Bourke, moved to Canberra in 1989 to join the Commonwealth Public Service, Margaret had represented Victoria in the Women’s Team 13 times at the ANC, winning six times. Margaret was proud of her 47 continual years of attendance at the ANC. However, her best performance was representing Australia on 31 occasions, currently more than any other player. Margaret and her husband were prolific collectors of bridge books and donated part of their collection of nearly 10,000 items to the State Library Victoria in Australia creating "the most extensive collection of books on the game of bridge in any public institution of the world” (Des Cowley, State Librarian). Once retired, Margaret threw herself into voluntary work, both at ABF headquarters in Canberra, and the Canberra Senior Citizens Book Fair for which she was the chief organizer for many years. Margaret died after a three-year battle against melanoma.

Written by her husband, Tim.

Cynthia De Lisle (Ferguson 1945)

Throughout our time together, Mum often told me of her very happy years at MGG. She often spoke of the many close friendships developed through those years, friends with whom she kept quite close contact over the 93 years of her life.

Throughout that life, Mum worked hard to help create a very happy life for myself, my sister and my two brothers. We always were a very happy family and Mum's life was rich and fulfilling in every way. Rest in peace Mum, with my fondest love.

Written by her son Chris.

Cynthia lived in Montville for many years where her husband, Gordon, had an art gallery. They were very much involved in the art world. Cynthia left school in 1945 as did Anne Browne (Nevitt) and I (Betty Darby). We kept in touch all those years – we had 13 children between us so were quite busy!! All 93 years old!

Written by school friend, Betty Sharp (Darby 1945).

Faye Ennis-Harris (Hunt 1950)

Faye attended MCEGGS for her secondary education and was School Vice Captain in her final year, 1950.

She went on to do an arts degree at Melbourne University, and some years later, when her children were young, completed a Diploma of Education followed by a Masters of Education.  She taught secondary school French and English for many years, and then moved into teaching trainee language teachers at Melbourne University. She was involved in the Modern Language Teachers Association of Victoria for some years. In semi-retirement, she taught adults English as a second language.

She spent her last year in aged care in Townsville close to her daughter’s family.

Written by her daughter, Sally Cavalieri (Ennis 1978).

Sarah Harry (1990)

Sarah was a champion in the eating disorder, body positivity, yoga and HAES (Heath at Every Size) space. She was one of Australia’s leading body image and eating disorder specialists and her voice publicly heralded the body positivity movement in Australia. She co-founded Body Positive Australia and pioneered yoga for bigger bodies. 

Sarah was the author of the book Fat Yoga – Yoga for All Bodies, was on the Board of HAES Australia, regularly presented at universities and conferences, and was a past Board Member and Vice President of Eating Disorders Victoria. Sarah was a proud Ambassador for Vic Health Australia’s “This Girl Can” Campaign. Her activism and media commentary will leave a lasting legacy in the broader community.

In her personal life, Sarah was a devoted mother to two boys – Charlie and Max, sister to Pip, Nicola (both OGs) and Michael, and daughter to Mary and John. She was beloved by her friends and private clients. Her life was dedicated to smashing stereotypes, caring for others, and creating safe spaces for people to think differently about their bodies and lives – to know they were enough. She will be missed beyond measure. 

Written by her sister, Pip

Hazel Spiller (Beswicke 1939) 

Hazel was in her 99th year living and enjoying life in an aged care facility in Orange NSW when, quite suddenly, she became ill. Just days prior to her death, she was out and about spending time with her family. Hazel always had fond memories of her boarding days and the enduring friendships made. After leaving school she enrolled in a deportment course which resulted in becoming a mannequin for Berlei where, at age 17, she modelled undergarments for the various department store buyers who just happened to be men. She completed a dress design course at Emily MacPherson College which fostered her love of style. She sewed her own garments well into her 90's. Hazel and husband, Willis, farmed in Western Victoria before moving to Geelong. In her 90's she moved to Orange NSW with her only child to be closer to her grandchildren and great-grandchildren. She was a follower of Jesus and was grateful for her long life.

Written by her daughter, Fiona

Faye Ennis-Harris (Hunt 1950)

Faye attended MCEGGS for her secondary education and was School Vice Captain in her final year, 1950.

She went on to do an arts degree at Melbourne University, and some years later, when her children were young, completed a Diploma of Education followed by a Masters of Education.  She taught secondary school French and English for many years, and then moved into teaching trainee language teachers at Melbourne University. She was involved in the Modern Language Teachers Association of Victoria for some years. In semi-retirement, she taught adults English as a second language.

She spent her last year in aged care in Townsville close to her daughter’s family.

Written by her daughter, Sally Cavalieri (Ennis 1978).

Sarah Harry (1990)

Sarah was a champion in the eating disorder, body positivity, yoga and HAES (Heath at Every Size) space. She was one of Australia’s leading body image and eating disorder specialists and her voice publicly heralded the body positivity movement in Australia. She co-founded Body Positive Australia and pioneered yoga for bigger bodies. 

Sarah was the author of the book Fat Yoga – Yoga for All Bodies, was on the Board of HAES Australia, regularly presented at universities and conferences, and was a past Board Member and Vice President of Eating Disorders Victoria. Sarah was a proud Ambassador for Vic Health Australia’s “This Girl Can” Campaign. Her activism and media commentary will leave a lasting legacy in the broader community.

In her personal life, Sarah was a devoted mother to two boys – Charlie and Max, sister to Pip, Nicola (both OGs) and Michael, and daughter to Mary and John. She was beloved by her friends and private clients. Her life was dedicated to smashing stereotypes, caring for others, and creating safe spaces for people to think differently about their bodies and lives – to know they were enough. She will be missed beyond measure. 

Written by her sister, Pip

Hazel Spiller (Beswicke 1939) 

Hazel was in her 99th year living and enjoying life in an aged care facility in Orange NSW when, quite suddenly, she became ill. Just days prior to her death, she was out and about spending time with her family. Hazel always had fond memories of her boarding days and the enduring friendships made. After leaving school she enrolled in a deportment course which resulted in becoming a mannequin for Berlei where, at age 17, she modelled undergarments for the various department store buyers who just happened to be men. She completed a dress design course at Emily MacPherson College which fostered her love of style. She sewed her own garments well into her 90's. Hazel and husband, Willis, farmed in Western Victoria before moving to Geelong. In her 90's she moved to Orange NSW with her only child to be closer to her grandchildren and great-grandchildren. She was a follower of Jesus and was grateful for her long life.

Written by her daughter, Fiona

Faye Ennis-Harris (Hunt 1950)

Faye attended MCEGGS for her secondary education and was School Vice Captain in her final year, 1950.

She went on to do an arts degree at Melbourne University, and some years later, when her children were young, completed a Diploma of Education followed by a Masters of Education.  She taught secondary school French and English for many years, and then moved into teaching trainee language teachers at Melbourne University. She was involved in the Modern Language Teachers Association of Victoria for some years. In semi-retirement, she taught adults English as a second language.

She spent her last year in aged care in Townsville close to her daughter’s family.

Written by her daughter, Sally Cavalieri (Ennis 1978).

Sarah Harry (1990)

Sarah was a champion in the eating disorder, body positivity, yoga and HAES (Heath at Every Size) space. She was one of Australia’s leading body image and eating disorder specialists and her voice publicly heralded the body positivity movement in Australia. She co-founded Body Positive Australia and pioneered yoga for bigger bodies. 

Sarah was the author of the book Fat Yoga – Yoga for All Bodies, was on the Board of HAES Australia, regularly presented at universities and conferences, and was a past Board Member and Vice President of Eating Disorders Victoria. Sarah was a proud Ambassador for Vic Health Australia’s “This Girl Can” Campaign. Her activism and media commentary will leave a lasting legacy in the broader community.

In her personal life, Sarah was a devoted mother to two boys – Charlie and Max, sister to Pip, Nicola (both OGs) and Michael, and daughter to Mary and John. She was beloved by her friends and private clients. Her life was dedicated to smashing stereotypes, caring for others, and creating safe spaces for people to think differently about their bodies and lives – to know they were enough. She will be missed beyond measure. 

Written by her sister, Pip

Hazel Spiller (Beswicke 1939) 

Hazel was in her 99th year living and enjoying life in an aged care facility in Orange NSW when, quite suddenly, she became ill. Just days prior to her death, she was out and about spending time with her family. Hazel always had fond memories of her boarding days and the enduring friendships made. After leaving school she enrolled in a deportment course which resulted in becoming a mannequin for Berlei where, at age 17, she modelled undergarments for the various department store buyers who just happened to be men. She completed a dress design course at Emily MacPherson College which fostered her love of style. She sewed her own garments well into her 90's. Hazel and husband, Willis, farmed in Western Victoria before moving to Geelong. In her 90's she moved to Orange NSW with her only child to be closer to her grandchildren and great-grandchildren. She was a follower of Jesus and was grateful for her long life.

Written by her daughter, Fiona

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Pat Hocking (Stillman 1940) 

Pat Hocking entered the School in 1935 and, due to her popularity, excellent communication skills and poise, she became School Captain in 1940. A self-confessed tomboy, she excelled at all sports and loved Drama and English.

In 1942, she married Douglas Hocking. They were separated for their first three years, while he fought overseas. Contributing to the war effort herself, she worked at the Munitions Factory in Maribyrnong. On Doug’s return, they had three children, Robin, Penny and Merri. During these school years, Pat threw herself into voluntary work. The family enjoyed time as expats in Boston and London and travelled extensively. In 1972, Pat decided to follow her passion of writing. Following a course in non-fiction writing, she completed a library technician’s course and worked at Firbank. During the 1980s, she lost her son to cancer, so volunteered at the library of Peter Mac for another 15 years. In 1989, Pat ventured into writing her first biography, Stormy Petrol. Buoyed by its success, she wrote a second biography, on her father, Twice a Digger. From an early age, Pat loved writing poetry and she published three poetry books. First and foremost was her love of family. Her marriage of 72 years was a true love story. She had a strong personality, great wit and a strong sense of duty. She always said, “If you criticise something, you must suggest an alternative”. As her epitaph, she wanted, “A long and interesting life” and indeed it was.

Written by her daughter, Merri Drutchinin

Prue McColl (1962)

My twin sister and I commenced in 1956. Prue graduated in Science (Zoology) at Monash University and later began training as a programmer with the PMG. She had a great liking for jewellery making and subsequently graduated in gold and silversmithing at RMIT. A role as Recreation Officer with Preston Council was followed by Directorship of Morwell Valley Art Gallery. Returning to Melbourne to live, she became involved in the Women in Engineering programme at Melbourne University and then completed a Landscape Design qualification at NMIT. 

Prue volunteered extensively in community activities, one of which was the preparation of an atlas of the original garden at the 19th century Ziebells Farmhouse at Westgarthtown. She became secretary of Kew Community Festival, held leadership roles with Kew Garden Club and was a member of the research team of the Kew Historical Society, devoting much time in cataloguing its collection. 

Prue enjoyed several trips to the UK and Europe and to various parts of Australia. She was an active member of both the Probus and Lyceum Clubs, the latter of which allowed her to indulge her keen interest in photography, and she was involved in aqua aerobics for 25 years. 

Prue was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis in 1985 but she refused to allow this to dampen her boundless enthusiasm for such a wide variety of activities and interests. She was a devoted aunt, much loved by her nieces and nephews and their children. 

Prue is survived by her sister Elspeth Brinsmead (nee McColl) and twin sister Debbie Davis (nee McColl). She is sorely missed.

Written by her twin sister Debbie Davis

Antoinette Russell (Kirkpatrick 1944)

Born in Melbourne to parents of modest means, who nonetheless valued a good education,  Antoinette loved her school days but left at 16, which was common during the war years. A few years later, a woman came up Antoinette at a ball and offered her the chance to model the ‘New Look’ from Christian Dior with four French mannequins! And so followed a successful modeling career. In 1951, she married Allan Russell a young geologist. And at a time when overseas travel was almost unheard of, they travelled the globe from the isolation of places such as New Guinea, to the sophistication of London in the height of the 1960’s. In between, there were places such as Italy, New Zealand, Canada and the United States. Returning to Sydney in the late 1960’s so their daughters could have a place to call home, Antoinette pursued various artistic goals, including painting, sculpture and jewellery making and held a number of exhibitions of her work. Antoinette and Allan celebrated 70 years of marriage in March this year, and she will be missed greatly by her wide circle of family and friends.

Written by her daughter, Sarita

Pat Hocking (Stillman 1940) 

Pat Hocking entered the School in 1935 and, due to her popularity, excellent communication skills and poise, she became School Captain in 1940. A self-confessed tomboy, she excelled at all sports and loved Drama and English.

In 1942, she married Douglas Hocking. They were separated for their first three years, while he fought overseas. Contributing to the war effort herself, she worked at the Munitions Factory in Maribyrnong. On Doug’s return, they had three children, Robin, Penny and Merri. During these school years, Pat threw herself into voluntary work. The family enjoyed time as expats in Boston and London and travelled extensively. In 1972, Pat decided to follow her passion of writing. Following a course in non-fiction writing, she completed a library technician’s course and worked at Firbank. During the 1980s, she lost her son to cancer, so volunteered at the library of Peter Mac for another 15 years. In 1989, Pat ventured into writing her first biography, Stormy Petrol. Buoyed by its success, she wrote a second biography, on her father, Twice a Digger. From an early age, Pat loved writing poetry and she published three poetry books. First and foremost was her love of family. Her marriage of 72 years was a true love story. She had a strong personality, great wit and a strong sense of duty. She always said, “If you criticise something, you must suggest an alternative”. As her epitaph, she wanted, “A long and interesting life” and indeed it was.

Written by her daughter, Merri Drutchinin

Prue McColl (1962)

My twin sister and I commenced in 1956. Prue graduated in Science (Zoology) at Monash University and later began training as a programmer with the PMG. She had a great liking for jewellery making and subsequently graduated in gold and silversmithing at RMIT. A role as Recreation Officer with Preston Council was followed by Directorship of Morwell Valley Art Gallery. Returning to Melbourne to live, she became involved in the Women in Engineering programme at Melbourne University and then completed a Landscape Design qualification at NMIT. 

Prue volunteered extensively in community activities, one of which was the preparation of an atlas of the original garden at the 19th century Ziebells Farmhouse at Westgarthtown. She became secretary of Kew Community Festival, held leadership roles with Kew Garden Club and was a member of the research team of the Kew Historical Society, devoting much time in cataloguing its collection. 

Prue enjoyed several trips to the UK and Europe and to various parts of Australia. She was an active member of both the Probus and Lyceum Clubs, the latter of which allowed her to indulge her keen interest in photography, and she was involved in aqua aerobics for 25 years. 

Prue was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis in 1985 but she refused to allow this to dampen her boundless enthusiasm for such a wide variety of activities and interests. She was a devoted aunt, much loved by her nieces and nephews and their children. 

Prue is survived by her sister Elspeth Brinsmead (nee McColl) and twin sister Debbie Davis (nee McColl). She is sorely missed.

Written by her twin sister Debbie Davis

Antoinette Russell (Kirkpatrick 1944)

Born in Melbourne to parents of modest means, who nonetheless valued a good education,  Antoinette loved her school days but left at 16, which was common during the war years. A few years later, a woman came up Antoinette at a ball and offered her the chance to model the ‘New Look’ from Christian Dior with four French mannequins! And so followed a successful modeling career. In 1951, she married Allan Russell a young geologist. And at a time when overseas travel was almost unheard of, they travelled the globe from the isolation of places such as New Guinea, to the sophistication of London in the height of the 1960’s. In between, there were places such as Italy, New Zealand, Canada and the United States. Returning to Sydney in the late 1960’s so their daughters could have a place to call home, Antoinette pursued various artistic goals, including painting, sculpture and jewellery making and held a number of exhibitions of her work. Antoinette and Allan celebrated 70 years of marriage in March this year, and she will be missed greatly by her wide circle of family and friends.

Written by her daughter, Sarita

Pat Hocking (Stillman 1940) 

Pat Hocking entered the School in 1935 and, due to her popularity, excellent communication skills and poise, she became School Captain in 1940. A self-confessed tomboy, she excelled at all sports and loved Drama and English.

In 1942, she married Douglas Hocking. They were separated for their first three years, while he fought overseas. Contributing to the war effort herself, she worked at the Munitions Factory in Maribyrnong. On Doug’s return, they had three children, Robin, Penny and Merri. During these school years, Pat threw herself into voluntary work. The family enjoyed time as expats in Boston and London and travelled extensively. In 1972, Pat decided to follow her passion of writing. Following a course in non-fiction writing, she completed a library technician’s course and worked at Firbank. During the 1980s, she lost her son to cancer, so volunteered at the library of Peter Mac for another 15 years. In 1989, Pat ventured into writing her first biography, Stormy Petrol. Buoyed by its success, she wrote a second biography, on her father, Twice a Digger. From an early age, Pat loved writing poetry and she published three poetry books. First and foremost was her love of family. Her marriage of 72 years was a true love story. She had a strong personality, great wit and a strong sense of duty. She always said, “If you criticise something, you must suggest an alternative”. As her epitaph, she wanted, “A long and interesting life” and indeed it was.

Written by her daughter, Merri Drutchinin

Prue McColl (1962)

My twin sister and I commenced in 1956. Prue graduated in Science (Zoology) at Monash University and later began training as a programmer with the PMG. She had a great liking for jewellery making and subsequently graduated in gold and silversmithing at RMIT. A role as Recreation Officer with Preston Council was followed by Directorship of Morwell Valley Art Gallery. Returning to Melbourne to live, she became involved in the Women in Engineering programme at Melbourne University and then completed a Landscape Design qualification at NMIT. 

Prue volunteered extensively in community activities, one of which was the preparation of an atlas of the original garden at the 19th century Ziebells Farmhouse at Westgarthtown. She became secretary of Kew Community Festival, held leadership roles with Kew Garden Club and was a member of the research team of the Kew Historical Society, devoting much time in cataloguing its collection. 

Prue enjoyed several trips to the UK and Europe and to various parts of Australia. She was an active member of both the Probus and Lyceum Clubs, the latter of which allowed her to indulge her keen interest in photography, and she was involved in aqua aerobics for 25 years. 

Prue was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis in 1985 but she refused to allow this to dampen her boundless enthusiasm for such a wide variety of activities and interests. She was a devoted aunt, much loved by her nieces and nephews and their children. 

Prue is survived by her sister Elspeth Brinsmead (nee McColl) and twin sister Debbie Davis (nee McColl). She is sorely missed.

Written by her twin sister Debbie Davis

Antoinette Russell (Kirkpatrick 1944)

Born in Melbourne to parents of modest means, who nonetheless valued a good education,  Antoinette loved her school days but left at 16, which was common during the war years. A few years later, a woman came up Antoinette at a ball and offered her the chance to model the ‘New Look’ from Christian Dior with four French mannequins! And so followed a successful modeling career. In 1951, she married Allan Russell a young geologist. And at a time when overseas travel was almost unheard of, they travelled the globe from the isolation of places such as New Guinea, to the sophistication of London in the height of the 1960’s. In between, there were places such as Italy, New Zealand, Canada and the United States. Returning to Sydney in the late 1960’s so their daughters could have a place to call home, Antoinette pursued various artistic goals, including painting, sculpture and jewellery making and held a number of exhibitions of her work. Antoinette and Allan celebrated 70 years of marriage in March this year, and she will be missed greatly by her wide circle of family and friends.

Written by her daughter, Sarita

Compiled by
Written By

Marketing and Community Engagement Office

Melbourne Girls Grammar

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