02

From the Chair

As we approach the summer holidays and look to spend time with family and friends over Christmas, I am reminded of the tumultuous time we have experienced over the past three years. It was a time that challenged and tested us all; it gave focus to the things we value and appreciate and focussed our attention on those who provided us the necessary support, guidance, and strength. 

Melbourne Girls Grammar, as you will have heard me speak of so many times, managed this period remarkably well. Dr Meath and her leadership team provided outstanding governance and direction for the School and gave us strength in knowing that, as a community, we were in good hands. The community too rose in support of each other – they reached out virtually to those living alone, and provided their children and grandchildren with the solidity of familial foundations. Remember that world – it was constrained to our bedrooms and home offices and sometimes a 5km radius. We connected via Zoom as we played with different backgrounds and learnt how to read facial expressions distorted by pixels, or to listen to the intonations of voices when the camera was off. We were cut off and restricted, and constantly reminded we were ‘on mute’ – yet we managed! Such was our life. But we came through it relatively unscathed, and importantly our Grammarians bounced back and reconnected with their peers, teachers and friends, as did the members of our School community. 

We know that some did it tougher than others. The closure of borders meant we lost the possibility of face-to-face connection with family and loved ones. For some of our international students, this meant returning home to study offshore, while others remained in our Boarding House for an unimaginable extended period of time. They existed without family contact finding solace in the boarding house staff, and local supporters and guardians. Such was our world during COVID. 

Today, while COVID is still ever present, we have a new ‘normal’. While retaining the safety of our community, we have, like I am about to do, reboarded planes, travelled to other parts of the world and most importantly reconnected face-to-face.

Melbourne Girls Grammar, as you will have heard me speak of so many times, managed this period remarkably well. Dr Meath and her leadership team provided outstanding governance and direction for the School and gave us strength in knowing that, as a community, we were in good hands. The community too rose in support of each other – they reached out virtually to those living alone, and provided their children and grandchildren with the solidity of familial foundations. Remember that world – it was constrained to our bedrooms and home offices and sometimes a 5km radius. We connected via Zoom as we played with different backgrounds and learnt how to read facial expressions distorted by pixels, or to listen to the intonations of voices when the camera was off. We were cut off and restricted, and constantly reminded we were ‘on mute’ – yet we managed! Such was our life. But we came through it relatively unscathed, and importantly our Grammarians bounced back and reconnected with their peers, teachers and friends, as did the members of our School community. 

We know that some did it tougher than others. The closure of borders meant we lost the possibility of face-to-face connection with family and loved ones. For some of our international students, this meant returning home to study offshore, while others remained in our Boarding House for an unimaginable extended period of time. They existed without family contact finding solace in the boarding house staff, and local supporters and guardians. Such was our world during COVID. 

Today, while COVID is still ever present, we have a new ‘normal’. While retaining the safety of our community, we have, like I am about to do, reboarded planes, travelled to other parts of the world and most importantly reconnected face-to-face.

Melbourne Girls Grammar, as you will have heard me speak of so many times, managed this period remarkably well. Dr Meath and her leadership team provided outstanding governance and direction for the School and gave us strength in knowing that, as a community, we were in good hands. The community too rose in support of each other – they reached out virtually to those living alone, and provided their children and grandchildren with the solidity of familial foundations. Remember that world – it was constrained to our bedrooms and home offices and sometimes a 5km radius. We connected via Zoom as we played with different backgrounds and learnt how to read facial expressions distorted by pixels, or to listen to the intonations of voices when the camera was off. We were cut off and restricted, and constantly reminded we were ‘on mute’ – yet we managed! Such was our life. But we came through it relatively unscathed, and importantly our Grammarians bounced back and reconnected with their peers, teachers and friends, as did the members of our School community. 

We know that some did it tougher than others. The closure of borders meant we lost the possibility of face-to-face connection with family and loved ones. For some of our international students, this meant returning home to study offshore, while others remained in our Boarding House for an unimaginable extended period of time. They existed without family contact finding solace in the boarding house staff, and local supporters and guardians. Such was our world during COVID. 

Today, while COVID is still ever present, we have a new ‘normal’. While retaining the safety of our community, we have, like I am about to do, reboarded planes, travelled to other parts of the world and most importantly reconnected face-to-face.

Former principal Miss DJ Ross in her study.
Former Principal Christine Briggs with former Chair of Council John Blanch.
Former principal Catherine Misson with students.
Miss Gilman Jones ready to depart for England on leave.
Principal Dr Toni Meath congratulates a student at an assembly.
Principal Dr Toni Meath at an event.
Principal Dr Toni Meath with Ken Jasper AM
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The School has done the same. Dr Meath, took a well-deserved sabbatical in Term 2 after a tireless two years of managing our School through COVID. It was a time spent rebuilding and reconnecting – with the alma mater of our first principals (Hensley and Taylor) at Newnham College; with leading educators in girls’ schools to exchange ideas and reinstate our sister school network; and engaging with our more distant alumnae in London and New York. These connections are essential to the School particularly during a period of significant change – they enable us to remain at the forefront of education for young women.   

Our educators at the School have been the beneficiaries as have our Grammarians in this exposure to current pedagogical practices and advancements in girls’ education. With extensions into professional learning through the newly formed Melbourne Girls Grammar Institute (MGGI), and our connections with university academics and community leaders, as a Council we are confident that MGGS is well placed to attract and retain the best and brightest educators for our students. 

As a community of learners, we understand the importance of fostering a love of learning, a commitment to continuous improvement and career advancement. We hold these aspirations for our children and expect the best from their educators to model this passion and quest for knowledge.   

The School has done the same. Dr Meath, took a well-deserved sabbatical in Term 2 after a tireless two years of managing our School through COVID. It was a time spent rebuilding and reconnecting – with the alma mater of our first principals (Hensley and Taylor) at Newnham College; with leading educators in girls’ schools to exchange ideas and reinstate our sister school network; and engaging with our more distant alumnae in London and New York. These connections are essential to the School particularly during a period of significant change – they enable us to remain at the forefront of education for young women.   

Our educators at the School have been the beneficiaries as have our Grammarians in this exposure to current pedagogical practices and advancements in girls’ education. With extensions into professional learning through the newly formed Melbourne Girls Grammar Institute (MGGI), and our connections with university academics and community leaders, as a Council we are confident that MGGS is well placed to attract and retain the best and brightest educators for our students. 

As a community of learners, we understand the importance of fostering a love of learning, a commitment to continuous improvement and career advancement. We hold these aspirations for our children and expect the best from their educators to model this passion and quest for knowledge.   

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Former principal Miss DJ Ross in her study.
Former Principal Christine Briggs with former Chair of Council John Blanch.
Former principal Catherine Misson with students.
Miss Gilman Jones ready to depart for England on leave.
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Former principal Miss DJ Ross in her study.
Former Principal Christine Briggs with former Chair of Council John Blanch.
Former principal Catherine Misson with students.
Miss Gilman Jones ready to depart for England on leave.
Prev
Next
02

From the Chair

As we approach the summer holidays and look to spend time with family and friends over Christmas, I am reminded of the tumultuous time we have experienced over the past three years. It was a time that challenged and tested us all; it gave focus to the things we value and appreciate and focussed our attention on those who provided us the necessary support, guidance, and strength. 

Melbourne Girls Grammar, as you will have heard me speak of so many times, managed this period remarkably well. Dr Meath and her leadership team provided outstanding governance and direction for the School and gave us strength in knowing that, as a community, we were in good hands. The community too rose in support of each other – they reached out virtually to those living alone, and provided their children and grandchildren with the solidity of familial foundations. Remember that world – it was constrained to our bedrooms and home offices and sometimes a 5km radius. We connected via Zoom as we played with different backgrounds and learnt how to read facial expressions distorted by pixels, or to listen to the intonations of voices when the camera was off. We were cut off and restricted, and constantly reminded we were ‘on mute’ – yet we managed! Such was our life. But we came through it relatively unscathed, and importantly our Grammarians bounced back and reconnected with their peers, teachers and friends, as did the members of our School community. 

We know that some did it tougher than others. The closure of borders meant we lost the possibility of face-to-face connection with family and loved ones. For some of our international students, this meant returning home to study offshore, while others remained in our Boarding House for an unimaginable extended period of time. They existed without family contact finding solace in the boarding house staff, and local supporters and guardians. Such was our world during COVID. 

Today, while COVID is still ever present, we have a new ‘normal’. While retaining the safety of our community, we have, like I am about to do, reboarded planes, travelled to other parts of the world and most importantly reconnected face-to-face.

Melbourne Girls Grammar, as you will have heard me speak of so many times, managed this period remarkably well. Dr Meath and her leadership team provided outstanding governance and direction for the School and gave us strength in knowing that, as a community, we were in good hands. The community too rose in support of each other – they reached out virtually to those living alone, and provided their children and grandchildren with the solidity of familial foundations. Remember that world – it was constrained to our bedrooms and home offices and sometimes a 5km radius. We connected via Zoom as we played with different backgrounds and learnt how to read facial expressions distorted by pixels, or to listen to the intonations of voices when the camera was off. We were cut off and restricted, and constantly reminded we were ‘on mute’ – yet we managed! Such was our life. But we came through it relatively unscathed, and importantly our Grammarians bounced back and reconnected with their peers, teachers and friends, as did the members of our School community. 

We know that some did it tougher than others. The closure of borders meant we lost the possibility of face-to-face connection with family and loved ones. For some of our international students, this meant returning home to study offshore, while others remained in our Boarding House for an unimaginable extended period of time. They existed without family contact finding solace in the boarding house staff, and local supporters and guardians. Such was our world during COVID. 

Today, while COVID is still ever present, we have a new ‘normal’. While retaining the safety of our community, we have, like I am about to do, reboarded planes, travelled to other parts of the world and most importantly reconnected face-to-face.

Melbourne Girls Grammar, as you will have heard me speak of so many times, managed this period remarkably well. Dr Meath and her leadership team provided outstanding governance and direction for the School and gave us strength in knowing that, as a community, we were in good hands. The community too rose in support of each other – they reached out virtually to those living alone, and provided their children and grandchildren with the solidity of familial foundations. Remember that world – it was constrained to our bedrooms and home offices and sometimes a 5km radius. We connected via Zoom as we played with different backgrounds and learnt how to read facial expressions distorted by pixels, or to listen to the intonations of voices when the camera was off. We were cut off and restricted, and constantly reminded we were ‘on mute’ – yet we managed! Such was our life. But we came through it relatively unscathed, and importantly our Grammarians bounced back and reconnected with their peers, teachers and friends, as did the members of our School community. 

We know that some did it tougher than others. The closure of borders meant we lost the possibility of face-to-face connection with family and loved ones. For some of our international students, this meant returning home to study offshore, while others remained in our Boarding House for an unimaginable extended period of time. They existed without family contact finding solace in the boarding house staff, and local supporters and guardians. Such was our world during COVID. 

Today, while COVID is still ever present, we have a new ‘normal’. While retaining the safety of our community, we have, like I am about to do, reboarded planes, travelled to other parts of the world and most importantly reconnected face-to-face.

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Principal Dr Toni Meath congratulates a student at an assembly.
Principal Dr Toni Meath at an event.
Principal Dr Toni Meath with Ken Jasper AM
Prev
Next
Principal Dr Toni Meath congratulates a student at an assembly.
Principal Dr Toni Meath at an event.
Principal Dr Toni Meath with Ken Jasper AM
Prev
Next

The School has done the same. Dr Meath, took a well-deserved sabbatical in Term 2 after a tireless two years of managing our School through COVID. It was a time spent rebuilding and reconnecting – with the alma mater of our first principals (Hensley and Taylor) at Newnham College; with leading educators in girls’ schools to exchange ideas and reinstate our sister school network; and engaging with our more distant alumnae in London and New York. These connections are essential to the School particularly during a period of significant change – they enable us to remain at the forefront of education for young women.   

Our educators at the School have been the beneficiaries as have our Grammarians in this exposure to current pedagogical practices and advancements in girls’ education. With extensions into professional learning through the newly formed Melbourne Girls Grammar Institute (MGGI), and our connections with university academics and community leaders, as a Council we are confident that MGGS is well placed to attract and retain the best and brightest educators for our students. 

As a community of learners, we understand the importance of fostering a love of learning, a commitment to continuous improvement and career advancement. We hold these aspirations for our children and expect the best from their educators to model this passion and quest for knowledge.   

The School has done the same. Dr Meath, took a well-deserved sabbatical in Term 2 after a tireless two years of managing our School through COVID. It was a time spent rebuilding and reconnecting – with the alma mater of our first principals (Hensley and Taylor) at Newnham College; with leading educators in girls’ schools to exchange ideas and reinstate our sister school network; and engaging with our more distant alumnae in London and New York. These connections are essential to the School particularly during a period of significant change – they enable us to remain at the forefront of education for young women.   

Our educators at the School have been the beneficiaries as have our Grammarians in this exposure to current pedagogical practices and advancements in girls’ education. With extensions into professional learning through the newly formed Melbourne Girls Grammar Institute (MGGI), and our connections with university academics and community leaders, as a Council we are confident that MGGS is well placed to attract and retain the best and brightest educators for our students. 

As a community of learners, we understand the importance of fostering a love of learning, a commitment to continuous improvement and career advancement. We hold these aspirations for our children and expect the best from their educators to model this passion and quest for knowledge.   

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Throughout our history as a school, MGGS has always had strong educational leaders. Misses Gilman Jones and DJ Ross of whom many of you will be aware, were held in the highest esteem within educational circles beyond the red brick walls bordering our School. They fought for the rights of educators, new pedagogical models and espoused within their faculties at the time, a commitment to the female student and their advancement academically and within society. In fact, reflecting on the legacy of many of our principals, we can see the same energy, beliefs, and commitment to innovation in girls’ education. Catherine Misson brought to MGGS the transition program we now fondly know as Wildfell and seeded the notion of physical activity and dedicated counselling being intrinsic to a holistic education. Christine Briggs, her predecessor, saw the value of enhancing our community by reaching out to girls from international destinations and was the first to welcome international students to the School broadening its awareness of the beliefs and cultures of others. 

Today is no different. Dr Meath leads with a commitment to the advancement of student and teacher voice and celebrates and enables all forms of excellence including academic, physical and creative endeavours through revised pedagogy and curriculum enhancements specifically focused on girls. She has been identified as a leader in Victoria in her appointment as the inaugural Chair of the Victorian Academy of Teaching and Leadership selected from all industry sectors which is a huge acknowledgement of her capability and intellect.  

Dr Meath has also proactively reconnected with our international student communities, including providing the Welcome Address alongside Austrade representatives in Hanoi with the intention of welcoming our global community back to Australia and specifically MGGS. 

Our community is, and always will be, our strength. We can be proud of how well we have managed the past few years and embrace with enthusiasm the re-emergence of Melbourne Girls Grammar as a leader in girls’ education within local, national, and international communities.

Throughout our history as a school, MGGS has always had strong educational leaders. Misses Gilman Jones and DJ Ross of whom many of you will be aware, were held in the highest esteem within educational circles beyond the red brick walls bordering our School. They fought for the rights of educators, new pedagogical models and espoused within their faculties at the time, a commitment to the female student and their advancement academically and within society. In fact, reflecting on the legacy of many of our principals, we can see the same energy, beliefs, and commitment to innovation in girls’ education. Catherine Misson brought to MGGS the transition program we now fondly know as Wildfell and seeded the notion of physical activity and dedicated counselling being intrinsic to a holistic education. Christine Briggs, her predecessor, saw the value of enhancing our community by reaching out to girls from international destinations and was the first to welcome international students to the School broadening its awareness of the beliefs and cultures of others. 

Today is no different. Dr Meath leads with a commitment to the advancement of student and teacher voice and celebrates and enables all forms of excellence including academic, physical and creative endeavours through revised pedagogy and curriculum enhancements specifically focused on girls. She has been identified as a leader in Victoria in her appointment as the inaugural Chair of the Victorian Academy of Teaching and Leadership selected from all industry sectors which is a huge acknowledgement of her capability and intellect.  

Dr Meath has also proactively reconnected with our international student communities, including providing the Welcome Address alongside Austrade representatives in Hanoi with the intention of welcoming our global community back to Australia and specifically MGGS. 

Our community is, and always will be, our strength. We can be proud of how well we have managed the past few years and embrace with enthusiasm the re-emergence of Melbourne Girls Grammar as a leader in girls’ education within local, national, and international communities.

Throughout our history as a school, MGGS has always had strong educational leaders. Misses Gilman Jones and DJ Ross of whom many of you will be aware, were held in the highest esteem within educational circles beyond the red brick walls bordering our School. They fought for the rights of educators, new pedagogical models and espoused within their faculties at the time, a commitment to the female student and their advancement academically and within society. In fact, reflecting on the legacy of many of our principals, we can see the same energy, beliefs, and commitment to innovation in girls’ education. Catherine Misson brought to MGGS the transition program we now fondly know as Wildfell and seeded the notion of physical activity and dedicated counselling being intrinsic to a holistic education. Christine Briggs, her predecessor, saw the value of enhancing our community by reaching out to girls from international destinations and was the first to welcome international students to the School broadening its awareness of the beliefs and cultures of others. 

Today is no different. Dr Meath leads with a commitment to the advancement of student and teacher voice and celebrates and enables all forms of excellence including academic, physical and creative endeavours through revised pedagogy and curriculum enhancements specifically focused on girls. She has been identified as a leader in Victoria in her appointment as the inaugural Chair of the Victorian Academy of Teaching and Leadership selected from all industry sectors which is a huge acknowledgement of her capability and intellect.  

Dr Meath has also proactively reconnected with our international student communities, including providing the Welcome Address alongside Austrade representatives in Hanoi with the intention of welcoming our global community back to Australia and specifically MGGS. 

Our community is, and always will be, our strength. We can be proud of how well we have managed the past few years and embrace with enthusiasm the re-emergence of Melbourne Girls Grammar as a leader in girls’ education within local, national, and international communities.

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