08

Finding your Passion

At the 1997 World Cup in India, the Australian Women’s Cricket team toured with 14 players and four support staff – coach, team manager, physiotherapist, and doctor. Players absorbed the financial bill of representing their country, and players and support staff took leave without pay from their ‘regular jobs’. In 2020, the touring party for Australian teams consists of 10 support staff with roles broadening beyond coaching and medical to include media, data analytics and security.  

This single case study reflects the changing landscape of sport over the past 20 years. Notably, the commercialisation of sport and growth in employment, as well as the steady rise and push for progress in gender equity in and through sport.

Sport is integral to the Australian way of life - connecting people, building community, and changing lives.

Melbourne Girls Grammar has long been committed to providing choice and challenge, and the right environment for students to thrive through their sporting experiences and physical performance and fitness endeavours.

One of the signs of a thriving school sport and activity program is the number of graduating students who return to coach, umpire, or administrate within the various sports. Giving back to the community where their own sporting journey may have commenced is a unique and rewarding opportunity, and we pay enormous gratitude to the number of Grammarians who continue to provide leadership and positive role modelling to their younger sisters.  

We are proud of Old Grammarians who have carved prominent careers in sport - Kitty Chiller AM (1981), CEO Gymnastics Australia and Kate O’Sullivan (1985), Essendon Football Club Board Member in sports administration and governance, and award-winning sports journalist Caroline Wilson (1977) who continues to so generously give back to our community. More recently, Isabelle Smith (2010) has been instrumental in founding the women’s team at the Old Melburnians Football Club, and we are thrilled to be working closely with Issy to provide a football pathway for current Grammarians beyond our red brick walls. Phoebe McWilliams (2003) joined the Artemis team this year and is combining her work in sports administration and communications with a professional sporting career as an AFLW player.

Within our current senior cohort, three students generously shared their dreams for a future in which they hope to positively impact the lives of others through sport. I am confident that not only will these Grammarians 'stand on the shoulders of giants', but they will be agents of continual change and leadership, boldly pressing for progress for a better world. Hear from Eliza, 2020 Sports Captain, Sophie, 2020 School Vice Captain and Isabella, 2020 Athletics Captain.

One of the signs of a thriving school sport and activity program is the number of graduating students who return to coach, umpire, or administrate within the various sports. Giving back to the community where their own sporting journey may have commenced is a unique and rewarding opportunity, and we pay enormous gratitude to the number of Grammarians who continue to provide leadership and positive role modelling to their younger sisters.  

We are proud of Old Grammarians who have carved prominent careers in sport - Kitty Chiller AM (1981), CEO Gymnastics Australia and Kate O’Sullivan (1985), Essendon Football Club Board Member in sports administration and governance, and award-winning sports journalist Caroline Wilson (1977) who continues to so generously give back to our community. More recently, Isabelle Smith (2010) has been instrumental in founding the women’s team at the Old Melburnians Football Club, and we are thrilled to be working closely with Issy to provide a football pathway for current Grammarians beyond our red brick walls. Phoebe McWilliams (2003) joined the Artemis team this year and is combining her work in sports administration and communications with a professional sporting career as an AFLW player.

Within our current senior cohort, three students generously shared their dreams for a future in which they hope to positively impact the lives of others through sport. I am confident that not only will these Grammarians 'stand on the shoulders of giants', but they will be agents of continual change and leadership, boldly pressing for progress for a better world. Hear from Eliza, 2020 Sports Captain, Sophie, 2020 School Vice Captain and Isabella, 2020 Athletics Captain.

One of the signs of a thriving school sport and activity program is the number of graduating students who return to coach, umpire, or administrate within the various sports. Giving back to the community where their own sporting journey may have commenced is a unique and rewarding opportunity, and we pay enormous gratitude to the number of Grammarians who continue to provide leadership and positive role modelling to their younger sisters.  

We are proud of Old Grammarians who have carved prominent careers in sport - Kitty Chiller AM (1981), CEO Gymnastics Australia and Kate O’Sullivan (1985), Essendon Football Club Board Member in sports administration and governance, and award-winning sports journalist Caroline Wilson (1977) who continues to so generously give back to our community. More recently, Isabelle Smith (2010) has been instrumental in founding the women’s team at the Old Melburnians Football Club, and we are thrilled to be working closely with Issy to provide a football pathway for current Grammarians beyond our red brick walls. Phoebe McWilliams (2003) joined the Artemis team this year and is combining her work in sports administration and communications with a professional sporting career as an AFLW player.

Within our current senior cohort, three students generously shared their dreams for a future in which they hope to positively impact the lives of others through sport. I am confident that not only will these Grammarians 'stand on the shoulders of giants', but they will be agents of continual change and leadership, boldly pressing for progress for a better world. Hear from Eliza, 2020 Sports Captain, Sophie, 2020 School Vice Captain and Isabella, 2020 Athletics Captain.

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I am confident that not only will these Grammarians 'stand on the shoulders of giants', but they will be agents of continual change and leadership, boldly pressing for progress for a better world.

Sally Bailey | Executive Director, Artemis Programs

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What area in sport, health or performance are you hoping to pursue?

Eliza: Sport psychology and athlete health.

Sophie: I would love to work part time in netball coaching and in swim teaching.

Isabella: I am hoping to pursue sports medicine, either as a physiotherapist or sports physician.

What area in sport, health or performance are you hoping to pursue?

Eliza: Sport psychology and athlete health.

Sophie: I would love to work part time in netball coaching and in swim teaching.

Isabella: I am hoping to pursue sports medicine, either as a physiotherapist or sports physician.

What experiences, opportunities or events have sparked this interest for you?  

Eliza: My interest was sparked through my involvement in organised sport and I have grown increasingly passionate in the recent year. Through maturing I have been able to understand my own experience with how I feel psychologically and how this effects my training and game day performance.

I would love to work with athletes and understand the fundamentals to be successful in team and individual sport. Listening to mindset coach, Ben Crowe, speaking to the Year 12 cohort at the beginning of this year was very informative and really set my desire to work in this field alight.

Sophie: I have always loved netball and swimming and have always wanted to work in the education field. Coaching combines my love for people (especially young, thriving people with active, enthusiastic and engaged minds), sports, and education.

I do love seeing good coaches in action. My first ever swim teacher, Evelyn, was an absolute legend and greatly admired by my family. She will go down in history! 

Isabella: I have always been interested in the field of health sciences (particularly medicine), as well as being extremely enthusiastic and heavily involved in sports all my life. Studying physical education as my 3/4 in Year 11 really increased my drive to become a physiotherapist as I loved learning about the musculoskeletal system, components of fitness and physiological testing. 

I have personally suffered from chronic injuries which have allowed me to experience first hand the importance of good and caring practitioners. I’m so grateful for the network I had to support me through the frustrations and sadness of dealing with injury, not being able to do what I love (run and compete), and the long rehabilitation journey.

What experiences, opportunities or events have sparked this interest for you?  

Eliza: My interest was sparked through my involvement in organised sport and I have grown increasingly passionate in the recent year. Through maturing I have been able to understand my own experience with how I feel psychologically and how this effects my training and game day performance.

I would love to work with athletes and understand the fundamentals to be successful in team and individual sport. Listening to mindset coach, Ben Crowe, speaking to the Year 12 cohort at the beginning of this year was very informative and really set my desire to work in this field alight.

Sophie: I have always loved netball and swimming and have always wanted to work in the education field. Coaching combines my love for people (especially young, thriving people with active, enthusiastic and engaged minds), sports, and education.

I do love seeing good coaches in action. My first ever swim teacher, Evelyn, was an absolute legend and greatly admired by my family. She will go down in history! 

Isabella: I have always been interested in the field of health sciences (particularly medicine), as well as being extremely enthusiastic and heavily involved in sports all my life. Studying physical education as my 3/4 in Year 11 really increased my drive to become a physiotherapist as I loved learning about the musculoskeletal system, components of fitness and physiological testing. 

I have personally suffered from chronic injuries which have allowed me to experience first hand the importance of good and caring practitioners. I’m so grateful for the network I had to support me through the frustrations and sadness of dealing with injury, not being able to do what I love (run and compete), and the long rehabilitation journey.

What experiences, opportunities or events have sparked this interest for you?  

Eliza: My interest was sparked through my involvement in organised sport and I have grown increasingly passionate in the recent year. Through maturing I have been able to understand my own experience with how I feel psychologically and how this effects my training and game day performance.

I would love to work with athletes and understand the fundamentals to be successful in team and individual sport. Listening to mindset coach, Ben Crowe, speaking to the Year 12 cohort at the beginning of this year was very informative and really set my desire to work in this field alight.

Sophie: I have always loved netball and swimming and have always wanted to work in the education field. Coaching combines my love for people (especially young, thriving people with active, enthusiastic and engaged minds), sports, and education.

I do love seeing good coaches in action. My first ever swim teacher, Evelyn, was an absolute legend and greatly admired by my family. She will go down in history! 

Isabella: I have always been interested in the field of health sciences (particularly medicine), as well as being extremely enthusiastic and heavily involved in sports all my life. Studying physical education as my 3/4 in Year 11 really increased my drive to become a physiotherapist as I loved learning about the musculoskeletal system, components of fitness and physiological testing. 

I have personally suffered from chronic injuries which have allowed me to experience first hand the importance of good and caring practitioners. I’m so grateful for the network I had to support me through the frustrations and sadness of dealing with injury, not being able to do what I love (run and compete), and the long rehabilitation journey.

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Sophie, our 2020 School Vice Captain coaches our Middle Years students in netball.
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What impact do you want to have?

Eliza: I would love to be able to communicate the significant link between a stable psychological state and a healthy lifestyle to aspiring young athletes, as well as students going through stressful school years. Importantly though, it would be a goal to be an effective communicator and base of support for young talent. Helping them to understand the relationship between physical activity and mental performance.  

Sophie: I aspire to be that netball coach or swim teacher that is remembered as a legend, and as someone who supported their every move and did what they could to get them confident on the court or in the pool.

Isabella: I want to be able to support my patients through their rehabilitation, not just in a physical sense, but mentally as well.

What impact do you want to have?

Eliza: I would love to be able to communicate the significant link between a stable psychological state and a healthy lifestyle to aspiring young athletes, as well as students going through stressful school years. Importantly though, it would be a goal to be an effective communicator and base of support for young talent. Helping them to understand the relationship between physical activity and mental performance.  

Sophie: I aspire to be that netball coach or swim teacher that is remembered as a legend, and as someone who supported their every move and did what they could to get them confident on the court or in the pool.

Isabella: I want to be able to support my patients through their rehabilitation, not just in a physical sense, but mentally as well.

What impact do you want to have?

Eliza: I would love to be able to communicate the significant link between a stable psychological state and a healthy lifestyle to aspiring young athletes, as well as students going through stressful school years. Importantly though, it would be a goal to be an effective communicator and base of support for young talent. Helping them to understand the relationship between physical activity and mental performance.  

Sophie: I aspire to be that netball coach or swim teacher that is remembered as a legend, and as someone who supported their every move and did what they could to get them confident on the court or in the pool.

Isabella: I want to be able to support my patients through their rehabilitation, not just in a physical sense, but mentally as well.

Why is this important to you?

Eliza: I am passionate about this because I believe it will honestly improve the lives of students at school and alleviate some stress. The sooner this link becomes common knowledge, the better for our aspiring athletes as well as adolescents and young adults struggling through their studies.

Sophie: I've been inspired by all my coaches and teachers and believe that the most lasting knowledge and skills have to be taught and engrained by a person who is passionate about the sport and ultimately wants to see the best their student can do. 

Isabella: I believe children, adolescents, and adults of all ages need regular physical activity. Physical activity promotes good health, and one should stay active across all life stages regardless of your body type and age. I see sports medicine as an avenue in which I can play a role to keep everyone, of all ages, in their best shape possible to allow them to stay healthy and active. 

Why is this important to you?

Eliza: I am passionate about this because I believe it will honestly improve the lives of students at school and alleviate some stress. The sooner this link becomes common knowledge, the better for our aspiring athletes as well as adolescents and young adults struggling through their studies.

Sophie: I've been inspired by all my coaches and teachers and believe that the most lasting knowledge and skills have to be taught and engrained by a person who is passionate about the sport and ultimately wants to see the best their student can do. 

Isabella: I believe children, adolescents, and adults of all ages need regular physical activity. Physical activity promotes good health, and one should stay active across all life stages regardless of your body type and age. I see sports medicine as an avenue in which I can play a role to keep everyone, of all ages, in their best shape possible to allow them to stay healthy and active. 

Why is this important to you?

Eliza: I am passionate about this because I believe it will honestly improve the lives of students at school and alleviate some stress. The sooner this link becomes common knowledge, the better for our aspiring athletes as well as adolescents and young adults struggling through their studies.

Sophie: I've been inspired by all my coaches and teachers and believe that the most lasting knowledge and skills have to be taught and engrained by a person who is passionate about the sport and ultimately wants to see the best their student can do. 

Isabella: I believe children, adolescents, and adults of all ages need regular physical activity. Physical activity promotes good health, and one should stay active across all life stages regardless of your body type and age. I see sports medicine as an avenue in which I can play a role to keep everyone, of all ages, in their best shape possible to allow them to stay healthy and active. 

Sam Mostyn, a prominent leader in business, government, and society, refers to sport as being the silent social worker; paying tribute to the examples of sport doing the heavy lifting for kids and communities when nothing else is available. We have seen steady growth in the tertiary offers our Grammarians have gained in the health and fitness industry, and it's down to the kind of stories we've seen from students like Isabella, Sophie and Eliza. They've been touched by what sport does and what it can do for others in the future.

Sam Mostyn, a prominent leader in business, government, and society, refers to sport as being the silent social worker; paying tribute to the examples of sport doing the heavy lifting for kids and communities when nothing else is available. We have seen steady growth in the tertiary offers our Grammarians have gained in the health and fitness industry, and it's down to the kind of stories we've seen from students like Isabella, Sophie and Eliza. They've been touched by what sport does and what it can do for others in the future.

Sam Mostyn, a prominent leader in business, government, and society, refers to sport as being the silent social worker; paying tribute to the examples of sport doing the heavy lifting for kids and communities when nothing else is available. We have seen steady growth in the tertiary offers our Grammarians have gained in the health and fitness industry, and it's down to the kind of stories we've seen from students like Isabella, Sophie and Eliza. They've been touched by what sport does and what it can do for others in the future.

Written By

Sally Bailey

Executive Director, Artemis Programs

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