08

It's Hard to Be What You Can't See

When we think about what we need to help us to learn, to grow, to thrive, to be at our best, to connect, and to feel a sense of belonging, we think about our environment. We think purposefully about how we design and build the physical environment, and we think about how we engineer our learning and coaching spaces to amplify our intentions.

There are multiple ways in which we see this play out, and when we really start to look for it, we begin to see how our coaches and teachers curate their environments to elicit the behaviours, routines, culture, and outcomes they want to see.

The World Around Us

The physical environment has been described as the ‘body language’ of an organisation, conveying its values and key messages even in the absence of its inhabitants.

Every time I step through the entrance of the Artemis Centre, I am struck by what Artemis represents to our School. Standing boldly at the top of Anderson Street Hill, Artemis embodies our commitment to prioritising the health and wellbeing of the students in our care.

On a much deeper level, Artemis signifies so much more and its timely to be reminded of the words spoken at the opening of the Artemis Centre on 1 September 2017 by former Chair of School Council – Professor Katie Allen – when she said:

“This building – built by women for women – reflects the broader societal seismic shifts that are taking place in our world. Changes that mean women are taking their place as equal partners not just in sharing the world, but in shaping the world that we live in. This building is a statement in the journey towards that tremendous goal.”

American civil rights activist Marian Wright Edelman is known for saying - “It’s Hard to be What You Can’t See.” Artemis is not only symbolic for the push for progress in gender equity, but within our walls we strive towards creating an environment through which our learners are encouraged and supported to build their competencies, confidence, character, and connection.

A well designed environment matters when it comes to how and when we move, compete, interact, and play – they are the bedrocks to enriching our lives through physical activity and fundamental to enhancing our wellbeing.
Sally Bailey, Director, Artemis Programs

The physical environment is one lens through which we observe how the spaces in which we inhabit shape us. A well designed environment matters when it comes to how and when we move, compete, interact, and play – they are the bedrocks to enriching our lives through physical activity and fundamental to enhancing our wellbeing.

For anyone who wanders through Artemis, a common experience is the sense of openness. We experience this visually, but we also feel this in how the spaces are connected across the four levels. There are spaces in which students and staff are physically active alongside spaces dedicated to wellbeing, social engagement, and learning.

This considered design feature makes physical activity visible and accessible. Spaces model a physical culture and showcase the range of options and programs available for Grammarians from ELC to Year 12. They amplify the opportunities for interactions between students, coaches, and teachers; they help to build relationships and connection.

Over the course of a day, there are myriad ways in which our coaches and teachers curate their practice and learning environments through use of language, constructing game scenarios or drill sequencing to reach a common goal and model our school values.

The World Around Us

The physical environment has been described as the ‘body language’ of an organisation, conveying its values and key messages even in the absence of its inhabitants.

Every time I step through the entrance of the Artemis Centre, I am struck by what Artemis represents to our School. Standing boldly at the top of Anderson Street Hill, Artemis embodies our commitment to prioritising the health and wellbeing of the students in our care.

On a much deeper level, Artemis signifies so much more and its timely to be reminded of the words spoken at the opening of the Artemis Centre on 1 September 2017 by former Chair of School Council – Professor Katie Allen – when she said:

“This building – built by women for women – reflects the broader societal seismic shifts that are taking place in our world. Changes that mean women are taking their place as equal partners not just in sharing the world, but in shaping the world that we live in. This building is a statement in the journey towards that tremendous goal.”

American civil rights activist Marian Wright Edelman is known for saying - “It’s Hard to be What You Can’t See.” Artemis is not only symbolic for the push for progress in gender equity, but within our walls we strive towards creating an environment through which our learners are encouraged and supported to build their competencies, confidence, character, and connection.

A well designed environment matters when it comes to how and when we move, compete, interact, and play – they are the bedrocks to enriching our lives through physical activity and fundamental to enhancing our wellbeing.
Sally Bailey, Director, Artemis Programs

The physical environment is one lens through which we observe how the spaces in which we inhabit shape us. A well designed environment matters when it comes to how and when we move, compete, interact, and play – they are the bedrocks to enriching our lives through physical activity and fundamental to enhancing our wellbeing.

For anyone who wanders through Artemis, a common experience is the sense of openness. We experience this visually, but we also feel this in how the spaces are connected across the four levels. There are spaces in which students and staff are physically active alongside spaces dedicated to wellbeing, social engagement, and learning.

This considered design feature makes physical activity visible and accessible. Spaces model a physical culture and showcase the range of options and programs available for Grammarians from ELC to Year 12. They amplify the opportunities for interactions between students, coaches, and teachers; they help to build relationships and connection.

Over the course of a day, there are myriad ways in which our coaches and teachers curate their practice and learning environments through use of language, constructing game scenarios or drill sequencing to reach a common goal and model our school values.

The World Around Us

The physical environment has been described as the ‘body language’ of an organisation, conveying its values and key messages even in the absence of its inhabitants.

Every time I step through the entrance of the Artemis Centre, I am struck by what Artemis represents to our School. Standing boldly at the top of Anderson Street Hill, Artemis embodies our commitment to prioritising the health and wellbeing of the students in our care.

On a much deeper level, Artemis signifies so much more and its timely to be reminded of the words spoken at the opening of the Artemis Centre on 1 September 2017 by former Chair of School Council – Professor Katie Allen – when she said:

“This building – built by women for women – reflects the broader societal seismic shifts that are taking place in our world. Changes that mean women are taking their place as equal partners not just in sharing the world, but in shaping the world that we live in. This building is a statement in the journey towards that tremendous goal.”

American civil rights activist Marian Wright Edelman is known for saying - “It’s Hard to be What You Can’t See.” Artemis is not only symbolic for the push for progress in gender equity, but within our walls we strive towards creating an environment through which our learners are encouraged and supported to build their competencies, confidence, character, and connection.

A well designed environment matters when it comes to how and when we move, compete, interact, and play – they are the bedrocks to enriching our lives through physical activity and fundamental to enhancing our wellbeing.
Sally Bailey, Director, Artemis Programs

The physical environment is one lens through which we observe how the spaces in which we inhabit shape us. A well designed environment matters when it comes to how and when we move, compete, interact, and play – they are the bedrocks to enriching our lives through physical activity and fundamental to enhancing our wellbeing.

For anyone who wanders through Artemis, a common experience is the sense of openness. We experience this visually, but we also feel this in how the spaces are connected across the four levels. There are spaces in which students and staff are physically active alongside spaces dedicated to wellbeing, social engagement, and learning.

This considered design feature makes physical activity visible and accessible. Spaces model a physical culture and showcase the range of options and programs available for Grammarians from ELC to Year 12. They amplify the opportunities for interactions between students, coaches, and teachers; they help to build relationships and connection.

Over the course of a day, there are myriad ways in which our coaches and teachers curate their practice and learning environments through use of language, constructing game scenarios or drill sequencing to reach a common goal and model our school values.

A Hive of Activity

When our Senior Years students enter the Fitness Hub to train, they are welcomed by our fitness coaches. They provide a valuable routine through personal connection and an opportunity to discuss a plan for that session so that there is an emphasis on purposeful practice and learning.

Our rowers conclude every training session with a sequenced and synchronised stretch routine that they complete in silence – a powerful display of team discipline and mindfulness.

In the pool, you’ll witness Head Coach Brad Harris guiding our swimmers through a sequence of drill progressions aimed to improve, for example, underwater skills. Rather than simply instruct, Brad will create a game-like scenario, or impose constraints to the drills so that swimmers are encouraged to think about and feel how they will execute the skill – an extremely effective tool to embed the learning implicitly and impact performance gains.

What we spend time on reflects what we value , and the time that our lead running coach – Colin Drake – invests to encourage and nurture a love of running in all our Grammarians is instrumental in bonding our athletes across year levels in a shared passion and endeavour. Running is the medium, a feeling of belonging and identity is the outcome.

On the courts, situations are created in practice to help players get comfortable performing under pressure. Manipulating the scoring system, putting something on the line, or adding meaning to the practice session are ways in which our coaches create an environment to replicate the feeling of pressure so that players build skills to work through it.

In Artemis, symbols of a positive sport culture are displayed through the installation of our four National Championship Oars, School Values, Artwork – and very soon, newly designed Honour Boards.

In the Jump Start room, Head of Gymnastics Katie Dunn exemplifies the notion of ‘having a go’. Dressing up as ‘Katie Carrot’ and many other characters, her environment is one that is of fun, lively adventures and creativity. She manages to do this whilst setting a tone for our Grammarians to feel safe and supported to try new things, to be courageous, and push outside their comfort zone.

Competence builds confidence, and I see this out on the track with multi’s coach, Greg Simpson, and his meticulous focus on technique development in our jumpers and throwers. It’s a nod to the integrity of his coaching.

A sense of team and togetherness is a significant focus on the mountain with the attention to detail Danny Geiger pays to how our snow sport athletes prepare over pre-season right down to how they wear their uniform.

A Hive of Activity

When our Senior Years students enter the Fitness Hub to train, they are welcomed by our fitness coaches. They provide a valuable routine through personal connection and an opportunity to discuss a plan for that session so that there is an emphasis on purposeful practice and learning.

Our rowers conclude every training session with a sequenced and synchronised stretch routine that they complete in silence – a powerful display of team discipline and mindfulness.

In the pool, you’ll witness Head Coach Brad Harris guiding our swimmers through a sequence of drill progressions aimed to improve, for example, underwater skills. Rather than simply instruct, Brad will create a game-like scenario, or impose constraints to the drills so that swimmers are encouraged to think about and feel how they will execute the skill – an extremely effective tool to embed the learning implicitly and impact performance gains.

What we spend time on reflects what we value , and the time that our lead running coach – Colin Drake – invests to encourage and nurture a love of running in all our Grammarians is instrumental in bonding our athletes across year levels in a shared passion and endeavour. Running is the medium, a feeling of belonging and identity is the outcome.

On the courts, situations are created in practice to help players get comfortable performing under pressure. Manipulating the scoring system, putting something on the line, or adding meaning to the practice session are ways in which our coaches create an environment to replicate the feeling of pressure so that players build skills to work through it.

In Artemis, symbols of a positive sport culture are displayed through the installation of our four National Championship Oars, School Values, Artwork – and very soon, newly designed Honour Boards.

In the Jump Start room, Head of Gymnastics Katie Dunn exemplifies the notion of ‘having a go’. Dressing up as ‘Katie Carrot’ and many other characters, her environment is one that is of fun, lively adventures and creativity. She manages to do this whilst setting a tone for our Grammarians to feel safe and supported to try new things, to be courageous, and push outside their comfort zone.

Competence builds confidence, and I see this out on the track with multi’s coach, Greg Simpson, and his meticulous focus on technique development in our jumpers and throwers. It’s a nod to the integrity of his coaching.

A sense of team and togetherness is a significant focus on the mountain with the attention to detail Danny Geiger pays to how our snow sport athletes prepare over pre-season right down to how they wear their uniform.

A Hive of Activity

When our Senior Years students enter the Fitness Hub to train, they are welcomed by our fitness coaches. They provide a valuable routine through personal connection and an opportunity to discuss a plan for that session so that there is an emphasis on purposeful practice and learning.

Our rowers conclude every training session with a sequenced and synchronised stretch routine that they complete in silence – a powerful display of team discipline and mindfulness.

In the pool, you’ll witness Head Coach Brad Harris guiding our swimmers through a sequence of drill progressions aimed to improve, for example, underwater skills. Rather than simply instruct, Brad will create a game-like scenario, or impose constraints to the drills so that swimmers are encouraged to think about and feel how they will execute the skill – an extremely effective tool to embed the learning implicitly and impact performance gains.

What we spend time on reflects what we value , and the time that our lead running coach – Colin Drake – invests to encourage and nurture a love of running in all our Grammarians is instrumental in bonding our athletes across year levels in a shared passion and endeavour. Running is the medium, a feeling of belonging and identity is the outcome.

On the courts, situations are created in practice to help players get comfortable performing under pressure. Manipulating the scoring system, putting something on the line, or adding meaning to the practice session are ways in which our coaches create an environment to replicate the feeling of pressure so that players build skills to work through it.

In Artemis, symbols of a positive sport culture are displayed through the installation of our four National Championship Oars, School Values, Artwork – and very soon, newly designed Honour Boards.

In the Jump Start room, Head of Gymnastics Katie Dunn exemplifies the notion of ‘having a go’. Dressing up as ‘Katie Carrot’ and many other characters, her environment is one that is of fun, lively adventures and creativity. She manages to do this whilst setting a tone for our Grammarians to feel safe and supported to try new things, to be courageous, and push outside their comfort zone.

Competence builds confidence, and I see this out on the track with multi’s coach, Greg Simpson, and his meticulous focus on technique development in our jumpers and throwers. It’s a nod to the integrity of his coaching.

A sense of team and togetherness is a significant focus on the mountain with the attention to detail Danny Geiger pays to how our snow sport athletes prepare over pre-season right down to how they wear their uniform.

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Brad Harris, Aquatics Program Manager and Head Coach, coaches swimmers in the Artemis Pool
Gymnasts in our Artemis Holiday Clinics
Grace Hallifax (Year 4) and Lexi Lamrock (Year 4) at the Morris Hall Athletics
Senior Years House Cross Country
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Brad Harris, Aquatics Program Manager and Head Coach, coaches swimmers in the Artemis Pool
Gymnasts in our Artemis Holiday Clinics
Grace Hallifax (Year 4) and Lexi Lamrock (Year 4) at the Morris Hall Athletics
Senior Years House Cross Country
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Sharing is caring

Observing the teaching practice of Head of Health and Physical Education, Monique Sharp, is akin to watching flow in action. We see the flow between campfire moments of careful instruction and passing of knowledge, and the watering hole moments where students in her care engage in peer learning to test and experience the application of theory into practise. All the while, Monique continues to provoke ongoing thinking and exploration of knowledge to deepen their understanding of complex systems.

Many of these examples are centred around the naturally occurring moments within our environments. By carefully and purposefully engineering our learning and coaching spaces, our intention is to foster an environment that has the power to shape our culture and our horizons.

Our Grammarians are our most inspiring and valued role models of all. We spoke with Scarlett Silverwood (Year 8), Zoe Paul (Year 9), Tilli Peters (Year 10), Jessica Swan (Year 11) and Merrin Giles (Year 12) about their Artemis experience. As you read and watch the lived experiences of our Grammarians reflecting on what Artemis means to them, you’ll get a strong sense of the vibrancy, soul and energy they bring to our spaces and programs – setting the tone for their peers and others to follow.

Sharing is caring

Observing the teaching practice of Head of Health and Physical Education, Monique Sharp, is akin to watching flow in action. We see the flow between campfire moments of careful instruction and passing of knowledge, and the watering hole moments where students in her care engage in peer learning to test and experience the application of theory into practise. All the while, Monique continues to provoke ongoing thinking and exploration of knowledge to deepen their understanding of complex systems.

Many of these examples are centred around the naturally occurring moments within our environments. By carefully and purposefully engineering our learning and coaching spaces, our intention is to foster an environment that has the power to shape our culture and our horizons.

Our Grammarians are our most inspiring and valued role models of all. We spoke with Scarlett Silverwood (Year 8), Zoe Paul (Year 9), Tilli Peters (Year 10), Jessica Swan (Year 11) and Merrin Giles (Year 12) about their Artemis experience. As you read and watch the lived experiences of our Grammarians reflecting on what Artemis means to them, you’ll get a strong sense of the vibrancy, soul and energy they bring to our spaces and programs – setting the tone for their peers and others to follow.

Why do you come to Artemis?

Merrin: I am a regular visitor to Artemis whether that be to swim in the pool, do a strength session in the gym or get something from the café to sit and enjoy with some friends. Aside from these regular activities I have also tried some of the wider range of offerings including snowsports, water polo, boxing, Pilates and yoga. I enjoy coming to Artemis to exercise as it’s a very friendly and inclusive environment where I am encouraged to try new things both individually and in a group setting. Beyond sport, Artemis offers a quiet space to study which I have taken advantage of as well as many spaces to catch up with teachers and wellbeing coaches which accommodates for informal meetings to chat about school and life in general.

Jessica: One of the main reasons I come to Artemis is to play sport. I love sport and am in Artemis almost every day for training, a match or for the gym. I swim with Artemis Aquatics, so I get to use the pool to train, and I also get to use the gym for sessions. Occasionally I buy my lunch from the Artemis Café, and at recess and lunch I sit with my friends either in the outdoor balcony area or on the ledges above the basketball court.

Tilli: I visit Artemis for multiple reasons every day – the main reason is to swim. Artemis allows me to train both in the pool and gym multiple times a week to reach my full potential in the sport. The facilities and equipment are amazing and simple to access making it a practical space. I also go to Artemis to meet with my wellbeing coach once a fortnight. I love sitting in the wellbeing wing, looking over at the Tan Track and gardens and talking to my wellbeing coach about whatever may be bothering me or upcoming events I need to prepare for. It's so helpful in keeping me on track and organised, and reducing my levels of stress. During lunch times, I like to come to Artemis to go to the cafe and get some yummy food or to use the Team Zone and kick the footy or play some basketball with my peers.

Zoe: Artemis is a single building, but one that holds many meanings for me. About 80% of the time, I come to Artemis to participate in sport. I consider myself to be a very active person, and getting involved in lots of sport at school is really beneficial for me. Rowing, athletics, GSV sports, you name it. Badminton, tennis, AFL, volleyball, cricket – whether it’s 6:00am in the morning or 6:00pm at night – you'll find me there! The next 10% for me is Fit For Life – the program in the Senior Years where Grammarians independently use Artemis and the programs provided to suit their own personal preferences when it comes to being active. The last 10% of my time in Artemis is comprised of time spent getting banana bread at Artemis Café, sitting on the lawn with my friends and chatting, and cracking on with work in the learning commons.

Scarlett: I come to Artemis to do Health and Physical Education, swimming and GSV tennis.

Why do you come to Artemis?

Merrin: I am a regular visitor to Artemis whether that be to swim in the pool, do a strength session in the gym or get something from the café to sit and enjoy with some friends. Aside from these regular activities I have also tried some of the wider range of offerings including snowsports, water polo, boxing, Pilates and yoga. I enjoy coming to Artemis to exercise as it’s a very friendly and inclusive environment where I am encouraged to try new things both individually and in a group setting. Beyond sport, Artemis offers a quiet space to study which I have taken advantage of as well as many spaces to catch up with teachers and wellbeing coaches which accommodates for informal meetings to chat about school and life in general.

Jessica: One of the main reasons I come to Artemis is to play sport. I love sport and am in Artemis almost every day for training, a match or for the gym. I swim with Artemis Aquatics, so I get to use the pool to train, and I also get to use the gym for sessions. Occasionally I buy my lunch from the Artemis Café, and at recess and lunch I sit with my friends either in the outdoor balcony area or on the ledges above the basketball court.

Tilli: I visit Artemis for multiple reasons every day – the main reason is to swim. Artemis allows me to train both in the pool and gym multiple times a week to reach my full potential in the sport. The facilities and equipment are amazing and simple to access making it a practical space. I also go to Artemis to meet with my wellbeing coach once a fortnight. I love sitting in the wellbeing wing, looking over at the Tan Track and gardens and talking to my wellbeing coach about whatever may be bothering me or upcoming events I need to prepare for. It's so helpful in keeping me on track and organised, and reducing my levels of stress. During lunch times, I like to come to Artemis to go to the cafe and get some yummy food or to use the Team Zone and kick the footy or play some basketball with my peers.

Zoe: Artemis is a single building, but one that holds many meanings for me. About 80% of the time, I come to Artemis to participate in sport. I consider myself to be a very active person, and getting involved in lots of sport at school is really beneficial for me. Rowing, athletics, GSV sports, you name it. Badminton, tennis, AFL, volleyball, cricket – whether it’s 6:00am in the morning or 6:00pm at night – you'll find me there! The next 10% for me is Fit For Life – the program in the Senior Years where Grammarians independently use Artemis and the programs provided to suit their own personal preferences when it comes to being active. The last 10% of my time in Artemis is comprised of time spent getting banana bread at Artemis Café, sitting on the lawn with my friends and chatting, and cracking on with work in the learning commons.

Scarlett: I come to Artemis to do Health and Physical Education, swimming and GSV tennis.

Why do you come to Artemis?

Merrin: I am a regular visitor to Artemis whether that be to swim in the pool, do a strength session in the gym or get something from the café to sit and enjoy with some friends. Aside from these regular activities I have also tried some of the wider range of offerings including snowsports, water polo, boxing, Pilates and yoga. I enjoy coming to Artemis to exercise as it’s a very friendly and inclusive environment where I am encouraged to try new things both individually and in a group setting. Beyond sport, Artemis offers a quiet space to study which I have taken advantage of as well as many spaces to catch up with teachers and wellbeing coaches which accommodates for informal meetings to chat about school and life in general.

Jessica: One of the main reasons I come to Artemis is to play sport. I love sport and am in Artemis almost every day for training, a match or for the gym. I swim with Artemis Aquatics, so I get to use the pool to train, and I also get to use the gym for sessions. Occasionally I buy my lunch from the Artemis Café, and at recess and lunch I sit with my friends either in the outdoor balcony area or on the ledges above the basketball court.

Tilli: I visit Artemis for multiple reasons every day – the main reason is to swim. Artemis allows me to train both in the pool and gym multiple times a week to reach my full potential in the sport. The facilities and equipment are amazing and simple to access making it a practical space. I also go to Artemis to meet with my wellbeing coach once a fortnight. I love sitting in the wellbeing wing, looking over at the Tan Track and gardens and talking to my wellbeing coach about whatever may be bothering me or upcoming events I need to prepare for. It's so helpful in keeping me on track and organised, and reducing my levels of stress. During lunch times, I like to come to Artemis to go to the cafe and get some yummy food or to use the Team Zone and kick the footy or play some basketball with my peers.

Zoe: Artemis is a single building, but one that holds many meanings for me. About 80% of the time, I come to Artemis to participate in sport. I consider myself to be a very active person, and getting involved in lots of sport at school is really beneficial for me. Rowing, athletics, GSV sports, you name it. Badminton, tennis, AFL, volleyball, cricket – whether it’s 6:00am in the morning or 6:00pm at night – you'll find me there! The next 10% for me is Fit For Life – the program in the Senior Years where Grammarians independently use Artemis and the programs provided to suit their own personal preferences when it comes to being active. The last 10% of my time in Artemis is comprised of time spent getting banana bread at Artemis Café, sitting on the lawn with my friends and chatting, and cracking on with work in the learning commons.

Scarlett: I come to Artemis to do Health and Physical Education, swimming and GSV tennis.

How does the time you spend in Artemis help you to learn and grow?

Merrin: Going to Artemis has taught me that regardless of your abilities you should give things a go whether that be going to the gym or trying a new team sport. It has also taught me to try new things and give everything a go. Artemis has given me the confidence to consistently come into the gym and ask for help or a new weights program which helps me to progress my skills and be able to trust my own abilities further. By facilitating many team sports Artemis has enabled me to broaden my social connections especially with those in different year levels. I have also learnt the importance of balancing study with exercise which Artemis has accommodated due to its varied spaces.

Jessica: Being in Artemis is a time for me to step back from schoolwork and challenge myself in other ways. I find that by having lots of fun activities and sport trainings in Artemis to break up my study it helps with my time management skills and contributes to improving my mood for the day. It helps me to create and maintain a healthy school routine.

Tilli: Artemis helps me to learn and grow as a person, this is because it is a very welcoming space that I feel confident in. Swimming at Artemis has taught me to always try my best and that that’s what counts in the long run. Artemis has helped me grow my passion for swimming and the relationships I have formed with peers, coaches and my team at Melbourne Girls Grammar. The Artemis program has given me the opportunity to try many different sports and work with many different coaches that I never thought I would do.

Zoe: When I was younger, I always preferred individual sports – relying on yourself to do the very best that you can, being your own biggest competitor. The first thing that comes to mind when I think about the lessons I’ve learnt whilst in Artemis is learning the importance and amazing culture of teamwork. Rowing for MGGS this year has been such an eye opener to how dependent, close and attached you become to your teammates. Early morning sessions in Artemis bring back such fond memories of girls cheering me on as I finished an ergo or a stair run or lifted another 10kg in the gym. Without experiences such as these, I don’t think that I would be as good a teammate as I am today, and I would have missed out on what is now such a cherished part of my life.

Scarlett: I've learned many new skills as a result of my time spent in Artemis. The most challenging skill I have learnt in Artemis is a sink kick tumble turn, I still haven’t perfected it yet, but I’ll keep working on it. Sometimes I get frustrated and other times it’s a lot of fun to learn something new that can help me develop.

How does the time you spend in Artemis help you to learn and grow?

Merrin: Going to Artemis has taught me that regardless of your abilities you should give things a go whether that be going to the gym or trying a new team sport. It has also taught me to try new things and give everything a go. Artemis has given me the confidence to consistently come into the gym and ask for help or a new weights program which helps me to progress my skills and be able to trust my own abilities further. By facilitating many team sports Artemis has enabled me to broaden my social connections especially with those in different year levels. I have also learnt the importance of balancing study with exercise which Artemis has accommodated due to its varied spaces.

Jessica: Being in Artemis is a time for me to step back from schoolwork and challenge myself in other ways. I find that by having lots of fun activities and sport trainings in Artemis to break up my study it helps with my time management skills and contributes to improving my mood for the day. It helps me to create and maintain a healthy school routine.

Tilli: Artemis helps me to learn and grow as a person, this is because it is a very welcoming space that I feel confident in. Swimming at Artemis has taught me to always try my best and that that’s what counts in the long run. Artemis has helped me grow my passion for swimming and the relationships I have formed with peers, coaches and my team at Melbourne Girls Grammar. The Artemis program has given me the opportunity to try many different sports and work with many different coaches that I never thought I would do.

Zoe: When I was younger, I always preferred individual sports – relying on yourself to do the very best that you can, being your own biggest competitor. The first thing that comes to mind when I think about the lessons I’ve learnt whilst in Artemis is learning the importance and amazing culture of teamwork. Rowing for MGGS this year has been such an eye opener to how dependent, close and attached you become to your teammates. Early morning sessions in Artemis bring back such fond memories of girls cheering me on as I finished an ergo or a stair run or lifted another 10kg in the gym. Without experiences such as these, I don’t think that I would be as good a teammate as I am today, and I would have missed out on what is now such a cherished part of my life.

Scarlett: I've learned many new skills as a result of my time spent in Artemis. The most challenging skill I have learnt in Artemis is a sink kick tumble turn, I still haven’t perfected it yet, but I’ll keep working on it. Sometimes I get frustrated and other times it’s a lot of fun to learn something new that can help me develop.

How does the time you spend in Artemis help you to learn and grow?

Merrin: Going to Artemis has taught me that regardless of your abilities you should give things a go whether that be going to the gym or trying a new team sport. It has also taught me to try new things and give everything a go. Artemis has given me the confidence to consistently come into the gym and ask for help or a new weights program which helps me to progress my skills and be able to trust my own abilities further. By facilitating many team sports Artemis has enabled me to broaden my social connections especially with those in different year levels. I have also learnt the importance of balancing study with exercise which Artemis has accommodated due to its varied spaces.

Jessica: Being in Artemis is a time for me to step back from schoolwork and challenge myself in other ways. I find that by having lots of fun activities and sport trainings in Artemis to break up my study it helps with my time management skills and contributes to improving my mood for the day. It helps me to create and maintain a healthy school routine.

Tilli: Artemis helps me to learn and grow as a person, this is because it is a very welcoming space that I feel confident in. Swimming at Artemis has taught me to always try my best and that that’s what counts in the long run. Artemis has helped me grow my passion for swimming and the relationships I have formed with peers, coaches and my team at Melbourne Girls Grammar. The Artemis program has given me the opportunity to try many different sports and work with many different coaches that I never thought I would do.

Zoe: When I was younger, I always preferred individual sports – relying on yourself to do the very best that you can, being your own biggest competitor. The first thing that comes to mind when I think about the lessons I’ve learnt whilst in Artemis is learning the importance and amazing culture of teamwork. Rowing for MGGS this year has been such an eye opener to how dependent, close and attached you become to your teammates. Early morning sessions in Artemis bring back such fond memories of girls cheering me on as I finished an ergo or a stair run or lifted another 10kg in the gym. Without experiences such as these, I don’t think that I would be as good a teammate as I am today, and I would have missed out on what is now such a cherished part of my life.

Scarlett: I've learned many new skills as a result of my time spent in Artemis. The most challenging skill I have learnt in Artemis is a sink kick tumble turn, I still haven’t perfected it yet, but I’ll keep working on it. Sometimes I get frustrated and other times it’s a lot of fun to learn something new that can help me develop.

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Adelaide Skipper (Year 12), Merrin Giles (Year 12), Ruby Jones (Year 11), Jessica Swan (Year 11)
Tilli Peters (Year 10)
Junior Year 9 rowers Matilda Unsworth Stroke, Zoe Paul, Sophie McKay, Emma Cafferkey and Lillyanne Johnston
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Adelaide Skipper (Year 12), Merrin Giles (Year 12), Ruby Jones (Year 11), Jessica Swan (Year 11)
Tilli Peters (Year 10)
Junior Year 9 rowers Matilda Unsworth Stroke, Zoe Paul, Sophie McKay, Emma Cafferkey and Lillyanne Johnston
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How do you feel when you're in Artemis?

Merrin: Artemis helps me to feel confident in myself and my abilities meaning I visit Artemis more frequently and my abilities and confidence continue to develop. Artemis has given me strength both physically and mentally through its broad use for exercise, study and wellbeing activities. The very inclusive environment at Artemis ensures I feel welcome and part of a connected community.

Jessica: When I’m in Artemis it makes me feel happy and takes my mind off things. It’s a place that makes me feel like I am in a safe and supportive environment, and I feel that I am always supported to challenge myself through physical activity and sport.

Tilli: When in Artemis, I feel happy and calm. Whether it be for training, a meeting or just getting food, I feel these things as it is a break from school work and a lively space that I enjoy coming to. It creates in me a feeling of calm and happiness.

Zoe: When I’m in Artemis, so many emotions come into play. The disappointment of not doing as well as you hoped, the newfound determination to try as hard as possible, the competitiveness that comes when playing a friendly match against your peers or the exhaustion after completing a particularly hard workout are all emotions that pop up. I would say one of the constants, however, is the feeling of safety and acceptance that allows me to freely experience all of these emotions, have fun, improve and get better at whatever I’m doing, and leave with a sense of accomplishment and happiness.

Scarlett: When I’m in Artemis I feel happy and excited because I love doing sport. It’s nice to be able to be away from the classrooms for an hour or two.

How do you feel when you're in Artemis?

Merrin: Artemis helps me to feel confident in myself and my abilities meaning I visit Artemis more frequently and my abilities and confidence continue to develop. Artemis has given me strength both physically and mentally through its broad use for exercise, study and wellbeing activities. The very inclusive environment at Artemis ensures I feel welcome and part of a connected community.

Jessica: When I’m in Artemis it makes me feel happy and takes my mind off things. It’s a place that makes me feel like I am in a safe and supportive environment, and I feel that I am always supported to challenge myself through physical activity and sport.

Tilli: When in Artemis, I feel happy and calm. Whether it be for training, a meeting or just getting food, I feel these things as it is a break from school work and a lively space that I enjoy coming to. It creates in me a feeling of calm and happiness.

Zoe: When I’m in Artemis, so many emotions come into play. The disappointment of not doing as well as you hoped, the newfound determination to try as hard as possible, the competitiveness that comes when playing a friendly match against your peers or the exhaustion after completing a particularly hard workout are all emotions that pop up. I would say one of the constants, however, is the feeling of safety and acceptance that allows me to freely experience all of these emotions, have fun, improve and get better at whatever I’m doing, and leave with a sense of accomplishment and happiness.

Scarlett: When I’m in Artemis I feel happy and excited because I love doing sport. It’s nice to be able to be away from the classrooms for an hour or two.

How do you feel when you're in Artemis?

Merrin: Artemis helps me to feel confident in myself and my abilities meaning I visit Artemis more frequently and my abilities and confidence continue to develop. Artemis has given me strength both physically and mentally through its broad use for exercise, study and wellbeing activities. The very inclusive environment at Artemis ensures I feel welcome and part of a connected community.

Jessica: When I’m in Artemis it makes me feel happy and takes my mind off things. It’s a place that makes me feel like I am in a safe and supportive environment, and I feel that I am always supported to challenge myself through physical activity and sport.

Tilli: When in Artemis, I feel happy and calm. Whether it be for training, a meeting or just getting food, I feel these things as it is a break from school work and a lively space that I enjoy coming to. It creates in me a feeling of calm and happiness.

Zoe: When I’m in Artemis, so many emotions come into play. The disappointment of not doing as well as you hoped, the newfound determination to try as hard as possible, the competitiveness that comes when playing a friendly match against your peers or the exhaustion after completing a particularly hard workout are all emotions that pop up. I would say one of the constants, however, is the feeling of safety and acceptance that allows me to freely experience all of these emotions, have fun, improve and get better at whatever I’m doing, and leave with a sense of accomplishment and happiness.

Scarlett: When I’m in Artemis I feel happy and excited because I love doing sport. It’s nice to be able to be away from the classrooms for an hour or two.

How is Artemis your enabler?

Merrin: As a boarder living onsite, having Artemis so close facilitates and encourages me to make the most of what there is to offer at school. Artemis has enabled me to try many new sports, in particular, it has allowed me to pursue my favourite sport – swimming. Without Artemis and all of these new opportunities I wouldn’t have made nearly as many connections with people at school as every sport unlocks new friendships. These positive experiences with sport at Artemis will enable me to continue a healthy and lasting relationship with sport and exercise beyond school.

Jessica: Artemis provides me with so many opportunities that I wouldn’t otherwise get a chance to do, such as being given the chance to swim in an excellent pool or utilise the gym and indoor court areas which I know that many other girls my age would not get access to. It encourages and inspires me to stay motivated and achieve my goals.

Tilli: Artemis is my enabler with swimming and just a big part of my everyday life. Without Artemis, I would not be able to swim like I do. Being a border at MGGS, Artemis is easy to access and makes getting to training of a morning easy as we don’t have to travel. Along with this the coaches and staff in Artemis are very helpful and supportive. Artemis is a place I feel comfortable to be me and try my best whether it is in the pool, gym or with friends.

Zoe: Artemis has been fundamental in enabling me to have hundreds of amazing experiences. All the amazing times I’ve had doing sport and being active at MGGS have been enabled by the Artemis Centre, including the casual moments I’ve had with my friends on the lawn or at the café. Artemis has enabled me to grow as a person and as a sportswoman; I can push and challenge myself, relax and be mindful, meet new friends and peers, and so much more! I’m so grateful to have access to this amazing facility and it’s become such an important part of my life. I strongly encourage everyone to get the most out of this amazing facility!

Scarlett: Artemis helps me to stay focused, keep a positive mindset and continuously practising it in training so it starts to become a habit.

How is Artemis your enabler?

Merrin: As a boarder living onsite, having Artemis so close facilitates and encourages me to make the most of what there is to offer at school. Artemis has enabled me to try many new sports, in particular, it has allowed me to pursue my favourite sport – swimming. Without Artemis and all of these new opportunities I wouldn’t have made nearly as many connections with people at school as every sport unlocks new friendships. These positive experiences with sport at Artemis will enable me to continue a healthy and lasting relationship with sport and exercise beyond school.

Jessica: Artemis provides me with so many opportunities that I wouldn’t otherwise get a chance to do, such as being given the chance to swim in an excellent pool or utilise the gym and indoor court areas which I know that many other girls my age would not get access to. It encourages and inspires me to stay motivated and achieve my goals.

Tilli: Artemis is my enabler with swimming and just a big part of my everyday life. Without Artemis, I would not be able to swim like I do. Being a border at MGGS, Artemis is easy to access and makes getting to training of a morning easy as we don’t have to travel. Along with this the coaches and staff in Artemis are very helpful and supportive. Artemis is a place I feel comfortable to be me and try my best whether it is in the pool, gym or with friends.

Zoe: Artemis has been fundamental in enabling me to have hundreds of amazing experiences. All the amazing times I’ve had doing sport and being active at MGGS have been enabled by the Artemis Centre, including the casual moments I’ve had with my friends on the lawn or at the café. Artemis has enabled me to grow as a person and as a sportswoman; I can push and challenge myself, relax and be mindful, meet new friends and peers, and so much more! I’m so grateful to have access to this amazing facility and it’s become such an important part of my life. I strongly encourage everyone to get the most out of this amazing facility!

Scarlett: Artemis helps me to stay focused, keep a positive mindset and continuously practising it in training so it starts to become a habit.

How is Artemis your enabler?

Merrin: As a boarder living onsite, having Artemis so close facilitates and encourages me to make the most of what there is to offer at school. Artemis has enabled me to try many new sports, in particular, it has allowed me to pursue my favourite sport – swimming. Without Artemis and all of these new opportunities I wouldn’t have made nearly as many connections with people at school as every sport unlocks new friendships. These positive experiences with sport at Artemis will enable me to continue a healthy and lasting relationship with sport and exercise beyond school.

Jessica: Artemis provides me with so many opportunities that I wouldn’t otherwise get a chance to do, such as being given the chance to swim in an excellent pool or utilise the gym and indoor court areas which I know that many other girls my age would not get access to. It encourages and inspires me to stay motivated and achieve my goals.

Tilli: Artemis is my enabler with swimming and just a big part of my everyday life. Without Artemis, I would not be able to swim like I do. Being a border at MGGS, Artemis is easy to access and makes getting to training of a morning easy as we don’t have to travel. Along with this the coaches and staff in Artemis are very helpful and supportive. Artemis is a place I feel comfortable to be me and try my best whether it is in the pool, gym or with friends.

Zoe: Artemis has been fundamental in enabling me to have hundreds of amazing experiences. All the amazing times I’ve had doing sport and being active at MGGS have been enabled by the Artemis Centre, including the casual moments I’ve had with my friends on the lawn or at the café. Artemis has enabled me to grow as a person and as a sportswoman; I can push and challenge myself, relax and be mindful, meet new friends and peers, and so much more! I’m so grateful to have access to this amazing facility and it’s become such an important part of my life. I strongly encourage everyone to get the most out of this amazing facility!

Scarlett: Artemis helps me to stay focused, keep a positive mindset and continuously practising it in training so it starts to become a habit.

Written By

Sally Bailey

Director, Artemis Programs

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